Coaching & After Care

Level III participants 1014

ELP Level III participants Oct14

One of the fun aspects of my role is the opportunity to pour into the staff and students at our centers. This past month I had the opportunity to participate and share with the ELP Level III participants. It was an exciting, engaging, fun week with some of our Program Managers and Directors as we learned about Organizational Health and Spiritual Development. As we discussed Situational Leadership, I did a coaching piece on S2-Coaching for the individual who is a Disillusioned Learner. With the disillusioned learner, you give specific instructions and closely walk with them for performance. The role of the coach at this Level is to move the person from a D2 to a D3 (Capable but Cautious Performer).  As the leader, you look for the area(s) where the person is stuck, assess the reasons why, enroll them in a coaching process (get buy-in for coaching to begin) and start the conversations. You can check out the teaching notes here.

Minnesota trip3

Randy Schmidt, Andree Aiken, Jim Moore

My visit to Minnesota Teen Challenge to observe their After Care and Recovery Coaching Programs was an amazing trip. Thanks to all the Minnesota TC leaders for hosting me especially thanks to Jim Moore, Senior Coach and Training Specialist for going above and beyond in making the connections and sharing ideas. I believe Coaching and After Care are two areas that God has his finger on for Teen Challenge. God’s heart is to have a vehicle by which we successfully transition graduates back into society. I’m working to develop such a program for the Southeast region. We are dedicated to mentor and nurture meaningful relationships [with our students and graduates] inspiring hope for their future (Star Man Blue Book).

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PensacolaW1014

This week I also had the opportunity to do morning devotions with the ladies at the Pensacola Women’s Home. These ladies were engaged in the idea that the Potter wants to put them back together again, but it takes an act of their will – a life totally surrendered to Christ. The ladies are hungry for more of God and the journey that God has them on. I prayed for one young lady who was only 2 days in the program and was struggling to leave. As I was praying for her the Lord gave me a vision – she was about 4 years old and He was pushing her on a swing. I prayed this over her and after the prayer she told me that vision was so significant because her happiest moments as a child were when she was being pushed on a swing. We talked about some of the benefits of staying at TC. Coaching happens in the moment – in this moment and that moment as God leads you to speak to someone. I like what Heidi Baker says “Stop for the one” –  first the One who is the one (Jesus) and then the one person who needs to see Jesus through your eyes. Rachel decided to stay at TC and left our discussion with a smile on her face.

Contributor: Andree Aiken, ELP Leader/Coach

ELP Highlight

My name is Hannah Larson. I am twenty-one-years old and am from Jacksonville, Florida.Hannah My family attended the Brownsville Revival when I was six and there I had my first encounters with God. It was around freshman year where my parents began to fight a lot and later separated. They got back together but still fought. I felt trapped, unwanted and unloved. Finally one night I cried out to God for help. The next morning, I got a phone call from my aunt who told me of an opportunity to intern at Columbus Teen Challenge. I was hesitant but said yes. I arrived at CGA (Yuchi) September 13, 2012 and on May 5, 2013 I became a residential staff and a part of a family I never dreamed I could have. Since being a part of ELP, I have learned new ways to loving people like Christ. Before Teen Challenge and ELP, I had distorted views of leadership. Now, I’ve realized I can lead by becoming like Jesus; serving and loving others.

ELP Rep’s Link – Nov 14

Level I Adult 

This month our core course is God’s Armor Bearer and our text is God’s Armor Bearer by Terry Nance. Support the vision of your leader and God will help you accomplish your vision in due season.  The study of this book and workbook will give understanding in just how to accomplish God’s plan as an armor bearer doing God’s will. The writer of the book served as an armor bearer to his pastor some twenty-five years with meekness and joy. Look for opportunities to affirm and celebrate your students when you see them practically applying the principles in this book.

Level I Adolescent

Our course for the Adolescent track is Self-Leadership and our text: Habitudes I  by Tim Elmore. This book is part of a series of 3 books. The books are created to guide you on your leadership journey. They are based on the fact that leadership isn’t merely one-dimensional – it runs 360 degrees – we influence others all around us. The leadership journey begins with self-leadership – we must lead ourselves before we lead anyone else.

Monthly Book Orders and Grades

Southeast region Rep’s can go to Google Drive and search for ELP Monthly Order Form and Grade Sheet Edited. Look for your center’s name in the tabs at the bottom and fill in your center’s information. No need to save or email the spreadsheet (Google Drive saves it and I can access the info from my Drive). If you place an initial order on the form and update the order later (i.e. add 2 more books) after we have ordered your books, please send Kerry Pevey (ELP Admin Asst) an email at kerry.pevey@teenchallenge.cc. Blessings!

Level II – Nov 2014

Welcome

This month we welcome Laurie Lusink (Davie) and Brad Bond (Ozark’s) to the Level II. Welcome Laurie & Brad! We look forward to a rich learning experience as we grow together.

Congratulations!

Congratulations to Rob Helfer (Vero Beach) and Sandra Marotta (Southwest Florida) on completing Level II! God has greater responsibilities in store for you; because you have been faithful in little, He’ll give you responsibility for more.

Congratulations also to Vicky Syfrett (West Florida) for moving on to your electives!

Core Courses

Our core course the next 3 months is Values in Leadership and our text: People First by Jack Lannom. People First™ teaches everyone how to value long-term, trust-based relationships over short-term gain; how to develop world-class leaders and pass on an enduring legacy. In this comprehensive leadership manual, the staff will study ten key principles in a systematic approach. It will challenge you as you work through thought provoking personal action plans at the end of each chapter. Get ready to be a Leader’s Leader!

Your first post will be on the forum on Monday, November 17th.

Enrich Culture – Developing People

In Teen Challenge we would say that we are “student-focused” – and we should be. However, sometimes a leader can be so student-focused that they look past the staff they are leading and, along with them, place most of their emphasis on the students. While a key leader may retain some aspects of student ministry, their primary ministry is to the people on the team they lead. And when a leader is growing and developing the people they lead, they can be sure the students will be growing and developing as well. So last month we looked at how a leader enriches culture through the practical skill of hiring the right people, this month we’ll look at the practical skill of developing people. Ken Blanchard, in his book “The Servant Leader”, says that a “key element of being a servant leader is to consider people’s development as an equal end goal as their performance.” Blanchard offers up a simple model for developing people with what he calls “Situational Leadership” and illustrates how Jesus was a Situational Leader. This model recognizes SLII-Color-Model-Exp_inprthat people are always on a development continuum based on 2 things: commitment and competence. When you started with Teen Challenge your commitment was high as you answered God’s call, but your competence was low because you’re new on the job, you have a lot to learn. Blanchard calls this an “enthusiastic beginner”. As you begin to learn your new role and experience challenges moving up the learning curve – maybe a student you’ve been counseling leaves the program – you may become a “disillusioned learner” as your commitment wavers. You may ask, am I really cut out for this? But as you continue to grow in competence, you reaffirm your commitment and become a “capable but cautious performer”, ultimately becoming a “self-reliant achiever”. (In our context, let’s acknowledge we’re still God-reliant achievers…) The leader’s role with Situational Leadership is to first “diagnose” which development level applies to the person. Secondly they demonstrate “flexibility” in adjusting their leadership style to that development level. For an enthusiastic beginner, it’s ok to be “directive” in your leadership – the person is new, they need to know what to do and how to do it. For a disillusioned learner the leader shifts to a “coaching” style – asking great questions while still providing direction to get the staff member over this hump. As the staff becomes a capable but cautious performer they need a “supportive” leadership style – they can do the job, they just need to be affirmed. Finally, the leader can “delegate” to the self-reliant achiever – empowering them and releasing them to flourish in their role. After diagnosis and flexibility in leadership style, the third skill of a situational leader is “partnering for performance” – working with the staff member to identify goals and a plan for on-going development. As a leader, when you create a culture that intentionally develops people and learn the skills to do this well, you’ll retain great people, your team will flourish, and students will be well served. And, if you are a staff member, guess what? These same situational leadership principles apply as you disciple students – think about how they go through these development levels in the program and how you adjust your approach accordingly… This month, read one of the Gospels with these principles of development in mind, how was Jesus a situational leader?

Article Contributed by: Karissa Corpeny, Director of Corporate Training

References:

The Servant Leader” – Blanchard & Hodges

Leading at a Higher Level” – Blanchard

ELP Highlights

Hi, my name is Courtney Hooper, I’m from Houston, Texas and I’m currently attending Courtneythe Columbus Girls Academy in Seale, AL. Since coming here, God has brought me out of my life of darkness and emptiness. He’s given me such an overflow of His unending, perfect love and grace and I only desire to give Him my everything in return. God has definitely called me to ministry in Teen Challenge after I graduate, and although I’m not sure what that life will look like, I’m trusting Him to lead and guide me as He already has been. ELP has grown and challenged me in ways that have completely transformed my ideas on leadership. It’s shown me what an authentic leader looks like, and has given me the ability to walk more steadily in following Christ’s example, who proclaimed that a true leader is one that gives away their life for others.

 

Enrich Culture – Getting the Right People on the Bus

Author Jim Collins says that people who aren’t a good fit for an organization’s values figures-368751_1280and culture get “ejected like a virus”. In creating a healthy organization, one of the roles of a leader is to set the culture of a team or organization, and then do the hard work of identifying and hiring people who are a right fit for the culture. Collins goes on to say, “first, get the right people on the bus, and then get them in the right seats.” Getting the right people on the bus means bringing people onto the team who embrace and embody the organization’s purpose, history, DNA, values, etc. The gifts and skills they bring and the role they can fill is secondary. It doesn’t mean that people who aren’t a right fit are bad people, or that they aren’t called and passionate to serve God, it just means that they’re called somewhere else. When a leader makes a rushed hiring decision because they need to “plug a hole”, it does a disservice not only to the team but to the person who should be serving and flourishing elsewhere. A person who is on the wrong bus ends up disillusioned and the team ends up frustrated. The leader has to spend more time in the long run fixing the mistakes of a poor hiring decision while doing the work of re-hiring.

The book, The Leadership Pipeline offers the following insight: “Managers quickly learn how to hire people with the talent and experience to do a given job properly; they find it more difficult to hire people who ‘fit’ a company’s work values and practices.” Good hiring decisions simply take time and effort. Have more than one conversation with the person, describe (candidly…) what it would be like to serve with the organization and with their potential team, does that sound like a bus they’d like to be on for a long journey? Get to know the interviewee’s passion, gifting, vision, and the values they are already living out. Does this align with the organization? Use any relevant assessments or hiring tools and be sure to call the references, what is their appraisal of this person’s fit? Again in The Leadership Pipeline, the authors make the case that good hiring practices are a skillset that every leader should value and make time for: “The most difficult change for first-time managers to make involves values. Specifically, they need to learn to value managerial work rather than just tolerate it. They must believe that making time for others, planning, coaching, and the like [hiring…] are necessary tasks and are their responsibility. More than that, they must view this other-directed work as mission-critical…” Due diligence won’t prevent every hiring mistake, but it will prevent many of them. It will save everyone a lot of heartache and go a long way in creating a healthy team and culture. Not only that, but the right staff hired today become the “seed bed” from which tomorrow’s leaders are selected from!

In the hiring process, the leader should not only be thinking of their immediate needs, but the organization’s future. If you have a responsibility for hiring, how have you been doing in that area? What could you do better? If not, think about some of the past hiring experiences you’ve been through, what went well and what went wrong? How will you shape your philosophy in this area when given the opportunity for this leadership responsibility?

Article contribution by: Karissa Corpeny  (Director of Corporate Training, TC Southeast)

 

Insights from the Rep’s

A LEADER WORTH FOLLOWING

 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep”  John 10:11.

Some questions that humble me as a leader are; “Am I a leader worth following?” “Do I model the values of our work and home culture?” “Do I do what I ask the team to do?”  “Am I willing to give up my own interests for what’s best for everyone else?” And the question that looms largest, “Will I lay down my life for my family and friends?” For me to be a leader worth following, I will answer affirmative to these revealing questions. Mostly though, I must follow the good shepherd – Jesus.

The Good Shepherd Defends

Jesus is the ultimate leader worth following. He is not “a,” but “the” Good Shepherd. He is good because He is God, and He grows good leaders. The good shepherd Jesus defends the sheep from aggressive enemies. Just as the shepherd David battled the lion and bear on behalf of his flock, so Jesus engages the enemy on our behalf. He sees danger coming before we do, so what may seem an unnecessary diversion may be His protection from a bad decision or bad people.

“The prudent see danger and take refuge, but the simple keep going and pay the penalty” (Proverbs 27:12).

The Good Shepherd Protects

A leader worth following protects his or her people. He lays down his life, his interests, and his ego for the greater good. The others-centered leader also invests in her team. She spends time in mentorship. Over lunch she systematically  helps the less experienced process their pressure points. The leader is vulnerable about her own issues and how she learned from others. A safe culture invites honesty, and the opportunity for professional growth.

Furthermore, what are some ways you can invest in the character of those who look to you as their leader? You have to be good in order to teach others how to be good. Your generosity enhances a culture of generosity. Your care creates a caring culture. Expose your team to books, training and conferences that challenge and grow their character and skills. Begin a weekly or monthly educational process that infuses the values of the culture throughout the enterprise. A leader worth following is out front as an example, among the team to learn, and behind in prayer.

“Follow my example, as I follow the example of Christ” (1 Corinthians 11:1).

Prayer: Heavenly Father grow me into a leader worth following. Lead me to lead like Jesus

Article contribution by: Deanna Trujillo (ELP Representative – Pensacola Women’s Home)

Level II – Oct 2014

Welcome

This month we welcome Todd Adams (Pensacola Men’s) and Glenn Yost (Genesis Men’s Home) to the Level II. Welcome Todd & Glenn! We look forward to a rich learning experience.

Core Courses

Our core course this month is Ministry Development and our text: From Dream to Reality by our very own Dr. Jerry Nance. You’ll learn principles such as:

  • The Leader Must Hear From God
  • Pray Hard, Work Hard, Then Pray God Blesses Your Work
  • Cherish and Celebrate Victories Along the Way
  • Staying True to Your Mission
  • Opposition Is A Part Of the Process
  • Learning to Laugh and more…

You can see your dream become a reality as you apply these principles and as you stay faithful to the dream in your heart. Don’t quit short of what God has put in your heart to accomplish!

Your first post will be up on the forum on Monday, October 20th.

ELP Rep’s Link – Oct 2014

We want to welcome Kerry Pevey (transfer from Accounts Payable Dept. ) to theKerry. Pevey Corporate Training Team as the ELP Administrative Assistant. Kerry is a great addition to the team and will be taking over the Level I application processing and book orders. Go ahead and send all Level I applications to her attention.

Level I Adult 

This month we continue with our course Knowing and Understanding God’sExperiencingGod Will and our text is Experiencing God by Blackaby, Blackaby and King. Your students should be about half way into this course and are learning more about being still and watching where God is working and join Him in His work rather than doing and then inviting God to bless their efforts. Look for opportunities to affirm and celebrate your students when you see them practically applying the principles in the book.

Level I Adolescent

Our course for the Adolescent track is Discover Your God-given Gifts and our text: Congratulations…You’re Gifted! by Doug Fields & Erik Rees. Your students will discover the place where your God-given passions and strengths intersect, and you’ll find the way you’re designed to serve. With interactive exercises and questions for you to answer, you’ll learn more about your:

S-piritual Gifts

    H-eart

         A-bilities

              P-ersonality

                    E-xperiences

Monthly Book Orders and Grades

Southeast region Rep’s can go to Google Drive and search for ELP Monthly Order Form and Grade Sheet Edited. Look for your center’s name in the tabs at the bottom and fill in your center’s information. No need to save or email the spreadsheet (Google Drive saves it and I can access the info from my Drive). If you place an initial order on the form and update the order later (i.e. add 2 more books) after we have ordered your books, please send Kerry Pevey an email at kerry.pevey@teenchallenge.cc. Blessings!