ELP Highlights

Hi, my name is Courtney Hooper, I’m from Houston, Texas and I’m currently attending Courtneythe Columbus Girls Academy in Seale, AL. Since coming here, God has brought me out of my life of darkness and emptiness. He’s given me such an overflow of His unending, perfect love and grace and I only desire to give Him my everything in return. God has definitely called me to ministry in Teen Challenge after I graduate, and although I’m not sure what that life will look like, I’m trusting Him to lead and guide me as He already has been. ELP has grown and challenged me in ways that have completely transformed my ideas on leadership. It’s shown me what an authentic leader looks like, and has given me the ability to walk more steadily in following Christ’s example, who proclaimed that a true leader is one that gives away their life for others.


Enrich Culture – Getting the Right People on the Bus

Author Jim Collins says that people who aren’t a good fit for an organization’s values figures-368751_1280and culture get “ejected like a virus”. In creating a healthy organization, one of the roles of a leader is to set the culture of a team or organization, and then do the hard work of identifying and hiring people who are a right fit for the culture. Collins goes on to say, “first, get the right people on the bus, and then get them in the right seats.” Getting the right people on the bus means bringing people onto the team who embrace and embody the organization’s purpose, history, DNA, values, etc. The gifts and skills they bring and the role they can fill is secondary. It doesn’t mean that people who aren’t a right fit are bad people, or that they aren’t called and passionate to serve God, it just means that they’re called somewhere else. When a leader makes a rushed hiring decision because they need to “plug a hole”, it does a disservice not only to the team but to the person who should be serving and flourishing elsewhere. A person who is on the wrong bus ends up disillusioned and the team ends up frustrated. The leader has to spend more time in the long run fixing the mistakes of a poor hiring decision while doing the work of re-hiring.

The book, The Leadership Pipeline offers the following insight: “Managers quickly learn how to hire people with the talent and experience to do a given job properly; they find it more difficult to hire people who ‘fit’ a company’s work values and practices.” Good hiring decisions simply take time and effort. Have more than one conversation with the person, describe (candidly…) what it would be like to serve with the organization and with their potential team, does that sound like a bus they’d like to be on for a long journey? Get to know the interviewee’s passion, gifting, vision, and the values they are already living out. Does this align with the organization? Use any relevant assessments or hiring tools and be sure to call the references, what is their appraisal of this person’s fit? Again in The Leadership Pipeline, the authors make the case that good hiring practices are a skillset that every leader should value and make time for: “The most difficult change for first-time managers to make involves values. Specifically, they need to learn to value managerial work rather than just tolerate it. They must believe that making time for others, planning, coaching, and the like [hiring…] are necessary tasks and are their responsibility. More than that, they must view this other-directed work as mission-critical…” Due diligence won’t prevent every hiring mistake, but it will prevent many of them. It will save everyone a lot of heartache and go a long way in creating a healthy team and culture. Not only that, but the right staff hired today become the “seed bed” from which tomorrow’s leaders are selected from!

In the hiring process, the leader should not only be thinking of their immediate needs, but the organization’s future. If you have a responsibility for hiring, how have you been doing in that area? What could you do better? If not, think about some of the past hiring experiences you’ve been through, what went well and what went wrong? How will you shape your philosophy in this area when given the opportunity for this leadership responsibility?

Article contribution by: Karissa Corpeny  (Director of Corporate Training, TC Southeast)


Insights from the Rep’s


 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep”  John 10:11.

Some questions that humble me as a leader are; “Am I a leader worth following?” “Do I model the values of our work and home culture?” “Do I do what I ask the team to do?”  “Am I willing to give up my own interests for what’s best for everyone else?” And the question that looms largest, “Will I lay down my life for my family and friends?” For me to be a leader worth following, I will answer affirmative to these revealing questions. Mostly though, I must follow the good shepherd – Jesus.

The Good Shepherd Defends

Jesus is the ultimate leader worth following. He is not “a,” but “the” Good Shepherd. He is good because He is God, and He grows good leaders. The good shepherd Jesus defends the sheep from aggressive enemies. Just as the shepherd David battled the lion and bear on behalf of his flock, so Jesus engages the enemy on our behalf. He sees danger coming before we do, so what may seem an unnecessary diversion may be His protection from a bad decision or bad people.

“The prudent see danger and take refuge, but the simple keep going and pay the penalty” (Proverbs 27:12).

The Good Shepherd Protects

A leader worth following protects his or her people. He lays down his life, his interests, and his ego for the greater good. The others-centered leader also invests in her team. She spends time in mentorship. Over lunch she systematically  helps the less experienced process their pressure points. The leader is vulnerable about her own issues and how she learned from others. A safe culture invites honesty, and the opportunity for professional growth.

Furthermore, what are some ways you can invest in the character of those who look to you as their leader? You have to be good in order to teach others how to be good. Your generosity enhances a culture of generosity. Your care creates a caring culture. Expose your team to books, training and conferences that challenge and grow their character and skills. Begin a weekly or monthly educational process that infuses the values of the culture throughout the enterprise. A leader worth following is out front as an example, among the team to learn, and behind in prayer.

“Follow my example, as I follow the example of Christ” (1 Corinthians 11:1).

Prayer: Heavenly Father grow me into a leader worth following. Lead me to lead like Jesus

Article contribution by: Deanna Trujillo (ELP Representative – Pensacola Women’s Home)

Level II – Oct 2014


This month we welcome Todd Adams (Pensacola Men’s) and Glenn Yost (Genesis Men’s Home) to the Level II. Welcome Todd & Glenn! We look forward to a rich learning experience.

Core Courses

Our core course this month is Ministry Development and our text: From Dream to Reality by our very own Dr. Jerry Nance. You’ll learn principles such as:

  • The Leader Must Hear From God
  • Pray Hard, Work Hard, Then Pray God Blesses Your Work
  • Cherish and Celebrate Victories Along the Way
  • Staying True to Your Mission
  • Opposition Is A Part Of the Process
  • Learning to Laugh and more…

You can see your dream become a reality as you apply these principles and as you stay faithful to the dream in your heart. Don’t quit short of what God has put in your heart to accomplish!

Your first post will be up on the forum on Monday, October 20th.

ELP Rep’s Link – Oct 2014

We want to welcome Kerry Pevey (transfer from Accounts Payable Dept. ) to theKerry. Pevey Corporate Training Team as the ELP Administrative Assistant. Kerry is a great addition to the team and will be taking over the Level I application processing and book orders. Go ahead and send all Level I applications to her attention.

Level I Adult 

This month we continue with our course Knowing and Understanding God’sExperiencingGod Will and our text is Experiencing God by Blackaby, Blackaby and King. Your students should be about half way into this course and are learning more about being still and watching where God is working and join Him in His work rather than doing and then inviting God to bless their efforts. Look for opportunities to affirm and celebrate your students when you see them practically applying the principles in the book.

Level I Adolescent

Our course for the Adolescent track is Discover Your God-given Gifts and our text: Congratulations…You’re Gifted! by Doug Fields & Erik Rees. Your students will discover the place where your God-given passions and strengths intersect, and you’ll find the way you’re designed to serve. With interactive exercises and questions for you to answer, you’ll learn more about your:

S-piritual Gifts





Monthly Book Orders and Grades

Southeast region Rep’s can go to Google Drive and search for ELP Monthly Order Form and Grade Sheet Edited. Look for your center’s name in the tabs at the bottom and fill in your center’s information. No need to save or email the spreadsheet (Google Drive saves it and I can access the info from my Drive). If you place an initial order on the form and update the order later (i.e. add 2 more books) after we have ordered your books, please send Kerry Pevey an email at kerry.pevey@teenchallenge.cc. Blessings!