3 Key Ingredients of a Coaching Conversation

Allowing our graduates to walk out their freedom in Christ while at Teen Challenge is necessary to prepare them to live successful Christian lives after TC. When a student first enters the program we tell them what to do because they are a new babe in Christ. As they become spiritually mature, we give them more responsibility to make decisions with the help of the Holy Spirit. This is key to helping our graduates transition back to society as productive citizens and where coaching is especially helpful in the discipleship process.

Being led by the Holy Spirit to ask the right questions at the right time of the right person

Two people having a conversation

Two people having a conversation

will help them develop the critical thinking skills necessary to adjust to life after TC. This will require several coaching conversations. A coaching conversation has three key ingredients which will move the person forward:

  1. Explores – connect with the students where they are at. Talk about the things they want to talk about. This is the student’s time to explore what’s inside of them and to have a simple conversation that will help them dream about the possibilities for their future.
  2. Excites – Get excited about  the things they are excited about. Excitement or joy is contagious and fires up the brain to create. If you are excited about their future, they are excited too and they will believe it’s possible to create. A joyful heart is good medicine.
  3. Exhorts – Be an Encourager – a Barnabas. Along the way, the student will meet upon obstacles which may prevent them from becoming who God created them to be. Your role is to encourage them to live from a stance of victory and not defeat. Encourage them to turn the trials into opportunities.

I have found that the best coaching conversations are in the moment – as you go about daily life on campus. You can draw out so much more when you are in a relaxed environment. Listen and watch for the moment to coach and ask these powerful questions:

What is here that you want to explore?
How does this fit with your plans and values?
What are you willing to do to accomplish this?
What support will you need along the way?
What is your desired outcome?

Article Submitted by: Andree Aiken, ELP Leader/Coach, TC Southeast

 

ELP Highlights – Dec 2015

Name: Michelle SheppardMichelle Shepphard

Age: 32
Hometown: Peoria, Arizona
Teen Challenge Center: Home of Hope, Casa Grande, AZ  Graduated : May 2013
My Testimony in Brief:
I grew up with a christian background, but never personally knew the Lord. When I reached my 20s- I made bad decisions and fell into alcohol addiction. At 29 years old- I finally found myself at rock bottom where I desperately wanted to change my life. I cried out to the Lord and he helped me! I was told about Teen Challenge and knew that was God’s will for me. I entered the program with restored hope and a new relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ!
The Purpose and Calling God Has Given Me:
I am now Education Coordinator of the Pensacola Teen Challenge Women’s Center! God has given me his blessing to lead these women to an understanding of His Word that will ultimately set the foundation for their recovery!
The ELP’s Impact on My Leadership:
ELP has impacted me tremendously. Each one of the 8 books has helped shape my character into that of Christ. In particular- Servant Leadership and Armor Bearer. This curriculum continues to help grow, challenge and confirm the calling that the Lord has on my life!

From the Rep’s Corner – Aug 2015

Here is a testimony of how coaching has helped one of our students.

Amber – 18 years oldstudentsponorship-17
“Coaching has absolutely changed my life! I believe that every Teen Challenge should have a coaching program. It isn’t easy by any means because of the effort and work you must put forth, but it is extremely beneficial. It challenges me to really dig deep into my relationship with God and depend on Him for the next step in my life. It helps me to see that the decisions I make now affect my future. Coaching is amazing and I love the fact that I get something new out of it every time. God has totally blessed me with this experience and opportunity.”
How has coaching helped you move forward in the program?
It’s helped me to address the things that I struggle with currently and that could be a struggle in the future. It’s helped me to grow. It’s made me more confident. Rather than focusing on the past, it’s focusing on who I can become in Christ. It pushes me to do things I never thought I could do, like lead others.
How has it prepared you as a leader?
It’s helped me to be a more gentle leader and to reach out to others in ways I was reached out to that helped me.
What makes coaching different than advising?
You focus on the future rather than the past. I am growing in areas that benefit the here and now and my future.
What’s been most helpful in coaching?
Being able to focus on one thing in a session rather than a million things. I am pushed to search things out for myself rather than feeding off other’s relationship with God. It’s helped me to dig deep in my relationship with God.

Rep’s Link

ELP Events

Registration is now open for the ELP Summit, April 23-25. If you and your students are planning to attend, go ahead and reserve your spot! Remember to indicate your t-shirt size and the sizes of your students when you register.

Level I Adult

This month our core course is Core Values and our text: Our Core Values by our very own Dr. Jerry Nance. Our Core Values connect our people to our culture. We are encouraged to practice these 7 values every day; during our operations, our decisions, how we act and what we believe. Dr. J says “my prayer is that this book will challenge you to become a person of integrity and compassion, who is full of vision and faith.” “I trust you will apply these truths in your community, and practice stewardship, and servanthood.”

Level I Adolescent

Our course for the Adolescent track is Discover Your Purpose and our text: Chazown by Craig Groetschel. Chazown (pronounced khaw-ZONE) from the Hebrew, meaning a dream, revelation, or vision. You were born with your own Chazown. Do you know what it is? God calls us to live on purpose, keeping the end in view. God’s vision for you is bigger than you can imagine and impossible for you to do on your own.

 

Monthly Book Orders and Grades

Southeast region Rep’s can go to Google Drive and search for ELP Monthly Order Form and Grade Sheet Edited. Look for your center’s name in the tabs at the bottom and fill in your center’s information. No need to save or email the spreadsheet (Google Drive saves it and I can access the info from my Drive). If you place an initial order on the form and update the order later (i.e. add 2 more books) after we have ordered your books, please send Kerry Pevey (ELP Admin Asst) an email at kerry.pevey@teenchallenge.cc. Blessings!

Enrich Culture – Building a Cohesive Team – More than Mediocre

A leader who is intentional about setting the culture, hiring people who fit the culture, and developing those people, now has the ingredients for an amazing team! In physics, cohesion is the force by which molecules in a substance are held together. In this article we’ll look at the factors by which team members come together to form a cohesive team. The book we’re drawing from this month is “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team” by Patrick Lencioni – in this book, Lencioni outlines 5 keys to creating a healthy high-performing team. Each principle builds on the former, so let’s begin with the end in mind. The ultimate footballteampurpose of a team is to get “Results”. A sports team wants to win the game, a military unit wants to achieve the tactical objective, a corporate team wants to see profits, a married couple wants to raise children who become healthy adults, and a Teen Challenge staff team wants to see lives transformed. I love how Lencioni recounts of hearing people say, “well we have a losing record this season, but we have a great team!” He’ll say “no, you don’t have a great team; you have a group of people who enjoy being together and are satisfied with mediocre results.” You might say that Teen Challenge is God’s business and we can’t measure everything – the results are up to Him. That’s partly true, but from well executed fundraising events to well-maintained buildings to changed lives…there are plenty of results we want to see in Teen Challenge.

Next, a team gets results because they are willing to embrace “Accountability”. Greg Hammond talks about this principle in creating a “peer culture” in the student body. He uses the example of a time when he constantly found old gum on the sidewalks of the campus. He could have added yet another rule to the policy manual and said, “No gum.” Instead he went to the student body and said, “You decide – if you want to keep chewing gum, keep it off the sidewalks.” The students took care of it themselves by holding one another accountable. And this is what makes accountability effective, when it operates with “Commitment” to agreed upon decisions, objectives or courses of action. With this kind of commitment the team member says, “I’m all in and I will do my best to support this decision and see it succeed.”

While the gum chewing example is a simple one, other decisions and courses of action are not so straightforward – should this student be dismissed? How can we improve our admissions process? Can we disciple our students more effectively? This is where cohesive teams learn to be comfortable with “Healthy Conflict”. This is nothing more than the pursuit of truth – what’s the very best decision? Is there a better idea? What will be the most effective solution? When team members are free to weigh in on the discussion, and are willing to do so, it’s more likely that the best decision will be made because everyone has brought their brains, experience and giftings to the table. Healthy conflict doesn’t necessarily lead to consensus – the leader will often have to make the call – but people can usually commit to decisions they’ve been allowed to give input on even if they disagree. This kind of honest discussion can only happen in a healthy culture, where there is the presence of “Trust” on a team. Lencioni calls this “vulnerability-based trust”, where people can speak up or admit they don’t have all the answers without fear of being judged or shot down. This kind of trust takes time and intentionality to cultivate on a team but everything else depends on this foundation.

Next month we’ll take a closer look at the role of the leader in these 5 areas. In the meantime, how are things on your team? Is it healthy and functional? Or is there sometimes an inattention to results, avoidance of accountability, lack of commitment, fear of conflict, or absence of trust?