Level II – Feb 2016

Welcome

This month we welcome Rhome Smith and Sean Soltero (Central FL Men’s) to the Level II!. Both leaders are graduates of Teen Challenge and TCIMI. Welcome guys! The Lord will grow your leadership and ask you to come up higher. Looking forward to walk this journey with you.

Core Courses

We are studying the course Practical Christianity and our text: Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald.

The values of our Western culture inclines us to believe that the busy, publicly-active person in ministry is also the most spiritual.  This course will guide you through practical spiritual disciplines which will assist in facing the daily challenges of being a disciple of Christ.  Topics include: prayer, journaling, and being a good steward of time and resources.  This course will help you draw attention to the difference between “knowing truth” and “living truth.” Print and fill-in your study guide as you go through the chapters. This will be graded at the end of the course.

Your first post will be up on the forum Monday, February 15th. You’ll make an initial post and respond to someone’s post.

From the Rep’s Corner

Mentoring and Coaching – Investing in Others

Pouring in versus drawing out – that’s one of the simplest ways to differentiate between mentoring and coaching.

There is a time and a place for pouring into, or mentoring, others. Those who have more life experience, wisdom, and Biblical knowledge have a responsibility to pass on what they know to those who are younger, whether in age or faith. Paul’s word to Timothy was to “entrust to reliable people who will also be qualified to teach others” (2 Timothy 2:2).  Multiplication of disciples at its finest – tell them what I told you, so they can tell others!

Mentoring says, “I love you enough to give you everything that I have. I want to see you succeed; here’s what I know to help you do that.”

Life Coaching, on the other hand, says, “I believe you have what it takes to figure this out. I love you enough to listen and give you my full attention while you talk through this and create your own plan of action and change.”

Coaches use open-ended questions to draw out what a person has in them. Additionally, Christian coaches rely on the principles that God initiates change and that His sheep hear His voice. Coaching keeps the responsibility for growth and change with the coachee. Though asking and listening takes more time than telling, the impact is powerful.

Within the ministry of Teen Challenge, both mentoring and coaching have their place. Both say to students, interns and staff, “I’m invested in you.” They just say it differently.

Ask yourself:

  • Who in my realm of influence would benefit from mentoring or coaching?
  • What is the impact of mentoring on a conversation? Of coaching on a conversation?
  • When is it most appropriate to use mentoring in your ministry? When is coaching most effective?
  • What’s one step you can take this month to grow in the disciplines of mentoring and/or coaching?

Article submitted by: Angela Hastings (ELP Rep/Coach, Hosanna House)

Enrich Culture – Shifting the Values

I hope you took some time last month to reflect on “how things are going in your boat”… In that article we said that after prayer, the most important thing a leader can do is build a healthy culture for the teams they lead. Leaders must delegate a lot of things, but culture is not one of them. The leader is solely responsible for how healthy a team or ministry is. As a leader, being a “culture bearer” requires a shift in values, skills and allocation of time. For instance, as a staff member I should value being an effective contributor to the team and the mission. I do my part to enrich culture by embracing and embodying the Core Values and the TC DNA. I would be honing a particular skill such as teaching, counseling or computer skills. My time would be primarily allocated to working with students or in administration, completing my assigned tasks and responsibilities. As a leader, whether I’m leading a rally team, a work crew or a center, my values and skillset have to shift, as well as how I manage my time. It’s important what we value – we spend our time doing the things we value, and skills that are used without being instructed by values, aren’t done with much passion and creativity. So if I’m directing a center, and value making individual contributions such as counseling, I will probably pursue a degree in counseling and spend a lot of time counseling students. Instead, as a team leader, there has to be a shift – rather than valuing what I can contribute individually, I now value the success and contributions of others, I value the results of the whole team, I value the work and disciplines I need to do as a manager. This managerial skillset includes things like setting the culture, selecting the right people who are a fit for the culture, designing job descriptions, empowerment and delegation, performance evaluation and development, communication, building a cohesive team, and rewards and motivation. The book “The Leadership Pipeline” talks about this shift: “First-time managers need to learn how to reallocate their time so that they not only complete their assigned work but also help others perform effectively. They cannot allocate all of their time to putting out fires, seizing opportunities, and handling tasks themselves.” Putting out fires…yikes! Sounds like Teen Challenge! One of the challenges of leadership is slowing down the high speed train that we call Teen Challenge and valuing and spending time on the right things. Effective leaders and healthy organizations value an enriched culture and take the time to cultivate it. In the next 3 articles we’ll highlight 3 very practical areas in which a leader enriches culture: bringing the right people on the team, developing people, and building a cohesive team. In the meantime, assess how you allocate your time – how does it reflect what you value?

Article written by – Karissa Corpeny – Director of Corporate Training (TC Southeast)