The Value of Coaching – One ED’s Experience

As John Maxwell says “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” This truth can have significant  impact on a  person; empowering them as person and a leader, and at times overwhelming them. In my life and leadership I have found myself at both ends of that pendulum at one time or another, struggling to navigate my way through challenges associated with life’s success and the hard times that life provides. Recently I have been working with a friend who I not only respect but has been working in the field of consulting and coaching to professionals, leaders and pastors and in doing so discovered a key to success, I am not alone! The question is how do I take advantage of the resource of people God has given me? What does that look like?

For me this process is to summed up in this quote by Zuse and Skiffington:    

“Coaching is a conversation, a dialogue, whereby the coach and the individual interact in a dynamic exchange to achieve goals, enhance performance and move the individual forward to greater success.”

To do this Scott and I meet weekly at a consistent time and place a focused effort  addressing the issues that we are coming together to address. Whether the topics are business or personal this meeting is a safe place that I can be transparent and honest and expect honest feedback and guidance. We work on strategic planning, goal developing peoplesetting and organizational development. We cover staffing issues, budget concerns, upline struggles as well as failures and success. This is not a class or webinar this is another person helping me process through my real world circumstances. Not a boss or subordinate but a partner who is helping me find the best answer to the needs of my life and business realities. A coach to challenge and encourage me to be and do my absolute best in every situation. A coach is not a player on my team he is a person who is on my side and wants me to win because our lives and values are aligned through intentional choices and commitment to one another.

The writer of Proverbs tells us that “Where there is no guidance the people fall, But in abundance of counselors there is victory.”:… Together we win!

Article by: David Kincaid, Executive Director – Middle GA TC

ELP Highlights – July 2015

Hello! My name is Haley Lonadier. I’m 30 years old from Haynesville, La. I am a Staff Haley Lonadiermember at Mt. Grace Teen Challenge for Women in Winnfield, La. I’ve now been in ELP for a little over a year and 5 months. I absolutely love it! ELP texts and studies have been very beneficial to my ministry as an emerging leader. The books for each course have been just what I needed at the right time. Being involved in the ELP course and working in Teen Challenge has helped me apply motivational skills and guided me to dig deep to find and use my God-given gifts. Also, this program has provided information that encourages me to set goals for success in my life and ministry. I have absolutely changed my direction to further my Biblical studies and personal life applications. Here at Teen Challenge through ELP, my abilities to perform in ministry are growing and escalating.  This program definitely requires endurance from each individual participating in it, which has helped me in other areas of ministry. ELP has impacted my life tremendously! I surely recommend this program to anyone wanting to make a difference…Thank you!

Level II Link

Current Course

We are just 2 posts away from finishing Values in Leadership and our text: People First by Jack Lannom.  you can slow mail or fax me your Personal Action Plans at the end of the course. These will be graded as your final assessment so if you are not caught up, now is a good time to do so.

 

 

Core Courses

Our next Core Course is Strategic Planning and Decision Making and our book: Executive Values by Kurt Senske. This book combines two aspects of Exec Values PICorganizational leadership not often mentioned in the same breath: getting results and integrating Christian values within an organization. Executive Values serves as a roadmap for incorporating faith and values into everyday organizational life. He demonstrates how doing well and doing good are inextricably linked, and provides a comprehensive strategy for utilizing Christian values to achieve organizational goals. Your first post will be up on Monday, Feb 16th.

Enrich Culture – Developing People

In Teen Challenge we would say that we are “student-focused” – and we should be. However, sometimes a leader can be so student-focused that they look past the staff they are leading and, along with them, place most of their emphasis on the students. While a key leader may retain some aspects of student ministry, their primary ministry is to the people on the team they lead. And when a leader is growing and developing the people they lead, they can be sure the students will be growing and developing as well. So last month we looked at how a leader enriches culture through the practical skill of hiring the right people, this month we’ll look at the practical skill of developing people. Ken Blanchard, in his book “The Servant Leader”, says that a “key element of being a servant leader is to consider people’s development as an equal end goal as their performance.” Blanchard offers up a simple model for developing people with what he calls “Situational Leadership” and illustrates how Jesus was a Situational Leader. This model recognizes SLII-Color-Model-Exp_inprthat people are always on a development continuum based on 2 things: commitment and competence. When you started with Teen Challenge your commitment was high as you answered God’s call, but your competence was low because you’re new on the job, you have a lot to learn. Blanchard calls this an “enthusiastic beginner”. As you begin to learn your new role and experience challenges moving up the learning curve – maybe a student you’ve been counseling leaves the program – you may become a “disillusioned learner” as your commitment wavers. You may ask, am I really cut out for this? But as you continue to grow in competence, you reaffirm your commitment and become a “capable but cautious performer”, ultimately becoming a “self-reliant achiever”. (In our context, let’s acknowledge we’re still God-reliant achievers…) The leader’s role with Situational Leadership is to first “diagnose” which development level applies to the person. Secondly they demonstrate “flexibility” in adjusting their leadership style to that development level. For an enthusiastic beginner, it’s ok to be “directive” in your leadership – the person is new, they need to know what to do and how to do it. For a disillusioned learner the leader shifts to a “coaching” style – asking great questions while still providing direction to get the staff member over this hump. As the staff becomes a capable but cautious performer they need a “supportive” leadership style – they can do the job, they just need to be affirmed. Finally, the leader can “delegate” to the self-reliant achiever – empowering them and releasing them to flourish in their role. After diagnosis and flexibility in leadership style, the third skill of a situational leader is “partnering for performance” – working with the staff member to identify goals and a plan for on-going development. As a leader, when you create a culture that intentionally develops people and learn the skills to do this well, you’ll retain great people, your team will flourish, and students will be well served. And, if you are a staff member, guess what? These same situational leadership principles apply as you disciple students – think about how they go through these development levels in the program and how you adjust your approach accordingly… This month, read one of the Gospels with these principles of development in mind, how was Jesus a situational leader?

Article Contributed by: Karissa Corpeny, Director of Corporate Training

References:

The Servant Leader” – Blanchard & Hodges

Leading at a Higher Level” – Blanchard

Buy Into Our Vision

Buy into” according to dictionary.com means “to be in unison, assent with another” (http://thesaurus.com/browse/buy+into).   In our 19 Days of Prayer e-memos we have been looking at the strands of the TC DNA and what these mean. The ELP is intentionally drilling down to the type of leader (sons/daughters) we want to raise up.  Yes, they should be servant leaders, they must have the Teen Challenge DNA (Earnest Prayer, Dependence on the Holy Spirit, Discipleship and the Jesus Factor, Exemplary Leadership, Personal Responsibility and Faith) and also, buy into our vision and strategy, the EFIVE.

sky-diving teamwork teen challenge elp

The challenge of every leader, new pastor and new business owner is to build a team of staff who buy into the vision you have for the future of your organization” (Dr. J Nance – From Dream to Reality).  Dr. J describes how he got the first staff to buy into his vision for TC FL:

The needs of the staff were overwhelming, and I knew we could not take the ministry beyond the development of the staff.  The biggest challenge was earning their trust and getting them to believe in me and in the goals I had for Teen Challenge. Through those intentional staff days we trained, taught them the vision and I was able to win their respect through spending time with them and caring for their positions within Teen Challenge.  These people could be transformed into a winning, faith-filled team with vision.

He created buy-in through his exemplary leadership, teaching and coaching. How will we get our Emerging Leaders to buy into our vision? Dr. J’s response “we build leaders through relationship building.”

“People don’t first follow worthy causes; they follow worthy leaderswho promote causes they can believe in”

 – John Maxwell

Blessings, Andree

Emerging Leaders Program Coach

ELP Summit 2013!

Emerging Leaders Program 2013 Summit

It’s that time of year again for our  ELP Summit! Our theme for the summit this year is “The DNA of Leadership.” We will be focusing on preserving the amazing heritage that our ministry has as well as ensuring that our future continues to carry the organization forward with the original DNA that we began with. We are trusting God to do some amazing things at the summit this year!

Dates: April 25-27

 

Check out our ELP Summit page for more information about the event!

Responsibility- To Self

Let’s recap, so far our acronym “Responsibility“:

(Click here to read the other articles in the Series)

Recruit
Equip and Train
Spirit-filled
Praying
Optimistic
Next Generation Leaders
who lead Self well

As you know, the Level I curriculum focuses heavily on self-leadership because we believe we lead ourselves first before we seek to lead others.  In this edition, I will draw heavily onHabitudes 1 “The Art of Self-Leadership” by Dr. Tim Elmore. Elmore says “leaders realize they are drivers – and are responsible for their attitudes and destination in life.” Being a driver is about taking responsibility for yourself and those under your care – taking ownership. “Individuals who don’t want to take responsibility have a victim mind-set; they are passengers in life.” However, when things go wrong, leaders are determined to remain drivers by taking responsibility for their attitudes, how they respond to problems and the direction of their lives.

Driving Pic

The role of the Rep is to coach the emerging leader to lead themselves well. Our student leaders are prone to fall short because they are not coached on how to manage themselves well. They have not developed the character to do what’s right even if they don’t feel like it, they are not secured in their identity in Christ and, in the busyness of life and work, our Core Values are not assessed against decisions.  As Reps, let us look for those coaching openings/opportunities to help our emerging leaders grow.  Identify those gaps in character, help them set SMART goals and execute plans which will move them from making excuses and default patterns to taking responsibility for their lives.

Blessings, Andree