Leaders develop leaders

It takes a leader to develop a leader – leaders learn best from other leaders. Emerging leaders want to be around leaders who have battle scars; who have actually been in the game and have a few blood stains on their uniforms. For emerging leaders to be seasoned, wise, and effective leaders, they need proximity to, and interaction with veteran leaders.

How do we do this?

  1. In Jesus’ day, it was common for leaders-in-training to simply follow the veteran leader around. They would walk together, talk together, eat their meals together, sleep in neighboring tents – they spent months and years living life with Jesus. The Scene_from_passion_of_the_christdisciples internalize the vision and values of the veteran leader in ways that served them the rest of their lives.  Although this sounds simple and time-sensitive, it was effective then, and can be effective now – there is no substitute for personal investment. Those of us who are more seasoned in leadership should order our lives in such a way that we can carve out time to invest in Gen-next.
  2. Mentor and coach small groups of young leaders. Mentoring and coaching curriculum like Start Right Mentoring are available to help in any situation. It is the responsibility of veterans to provide the necessary opportunities so the next generation of leaders will be trained and ready to meet the challenges of the future.

What is the best catalyst for a leader’s growth?

Make him or her lead something. After Jesus identified and invested in his disciples, the moment came when He said “Pack your bags, it’s show time!” It’s make-it or break-it time! It’s swim or sink time. He didn’t minimize the challenge; He sent them out like sheep among wolves. This is the real deal. The stakes are high, the possibility of failure is real and I’m not going to protect you from all risks. You’ve got to step out and go lead! We must hand emerging leaders an important kingdom baton, not a little make-believe job or a low-stakes challenge. Something that will make them feel believed in, valued, and held in high esteem. Something that will make them fall on their knees and cry out for God’s help; something that will demand the best they have to offer. Leaders live for high-stakes challenges; kingdom goals that make them gasp and gulp.

What am I advocating for?

High stakes leadership and Kingdom challenges. Provide opportunities, stand by our emerging leaders, cheer them on, help them solve problems, pray for them and coach them to higher effectiveness. Help them find their niche and reach their full potential. Whatever challenges Teen Challenge face in the years ahead, I hope we can face them with confidence knowing that we were wise enough to invest in Gen-next.

Article by: Andree Aiken, ELP Leader/Coach

Excerpts from the book Courageous Leadership by Bill Hybels

From the Rep’s Corner

Mentoring and Coaching – Investing in Others

Pouring in versus drawing out – that’s one of the simplest ways to differentiate between mentoring and coaching.

There is a time and a place for pouring into, or mentoring, others. Those who have more life experience, wisdom, and Biblical knowledge have a responsibility to pass on what they know to those who are younger, whether in age or faith. Paul’s word to Timothy was to “entrust to reliable people who will also be qualified to teach others” (2 Timothy 2:2).  Multiplication of disciples at its finest – tell them what I told you, so they can tell others!

Mentoring says, “I love you enough to give you everything that I have. I want to see you succeed; here’s what I know to help you do that.”

Life Coaching, on the other hand, says, “I believe you have what it takes to figure this out. I love you enough to listen and give you my full attention while you talk through this and create your own plan of action and change.”

Coaches use open-ended questions to draw out what a person has in them. Additionally, Christian coaches rely on the principles that God initiates change and that His sheep hear His voice. Coaching keeps the responsibility for growth and change with the coachee. Though asking and listening takes more time than telling, the impact is powerful.

Within the ministry of Teen Challenge, both mentoring and coaching have their place. Both say to students, interns and staff, “I’m invested in you.” They just say it differently.

Ask yourself:

  • Who in my realm of influence would benefit from mentoring or coaching?
  • What is the impact of mentoring on a conversation? Of coaching on a conversation?
  • When is it most appropriate to use mentoring in your ministry? When is coaching most effective?
  • What’s one step you can take this month to grow in the disciplines of mentoring and/or coaching?

Article submitted by: Angela Hastings (ELP Rep/Coach, Hosanna House)

ELP Highlights – July 2015

Hello! My name is Haley Lonadier. I’m 30 years old from Haynesville, La. I am a Staff Haley Lonadiermember at Mt. Grace Teen Challenge for Women in Winnfield, La. I’ve now been in ELP for a little over a year and 5 months. I absolutely love it! ELP texts and studies have been very beneficial to my ministry as an emerging leader. The books for each course have been just what I needed at the right time. Being involved in the ELP course and working in Teen Challenge has helped me apply motivational skills and guided me to dig deep to find and use my God-given gifts. Also, this program has provided information that encourages me to set goals for success in my life and ministry. I have absolutely changed my direction to further my Biblical studies and personal life applications. Here at Teen Challenge through ELP, my abilities to perform in ministry are growing and escalating.  This program definitely requires endurance from each individual participating in it, which has helped me in other areas of ministry. ELP has impacted my life tremendously! I surely recommend this program to anyone wanting to make a difference…Thank you!

Insights from the Rep’s

A LEADER WORTH FOLLOWING

 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep”  John 10:11.

Some questions that humble me as a leader are; “Am I a leader worth following?” “Do I model the values of our work and home culture?” “Do I do what I ask the team to do?”  “Am I willing to give up my own interests for what’s best for everyone else?” And the question that looms largest, “Will I lay down my life for my family and friends?” For me to be a leader worth following, I will answer affirmative to these revealing questions. Mostly though, I must follow the good shepherd – Jesus.

The Good Shepherd Defends

Jesus is the ultimate leader worth following. He is not “a,” but “the” Good Shepherd. He is good because He is God, and He grows good leaders. The good shepherd Jesus defends the sheep from aggressive enemies. Just as the shepherd David battled the lion and bear on behalf of his flock, so Jesus engages the enemy on our behalf. He sees danger coming before we do, so what may seem an unnecessary diversion may be His protection from a bad decision or bad people.

“The prudent see danger and take refuge, but the simple keep going and pay the penalty” (Proverbs 27:12).

The Good Shepherd Protects

A leader worth following protects his or her people. He lays down his life, his interests, and his ego for the greater good. The others-centered leader also invests in her team. She spends time in mentorship. Over lunch she systematically  helps the less experienced process their pressure points. The leader is vulnerable about her own issues and how she learned from others. A safe culture invites honesty, and the opportunity for professional growth.

Furthermore, what are some ways you can invest in the character of those who look to you as their leader? You have to be good in order to teach others how to be good. Your generosity enhances a culture of generosity. Your care creates a caring culture. Expose your team to books, training and conferences that challenge and grow their character and skills. Begin a weekly or monthly educational process that infuses the values of the culture throughout the enterprise. A leader worth following is out front as an example, among the team to learn, and behind in prayer.

“Follow my example, as I follow the example of Christ” (1 Corinthians 11:1).

Prayer: Heavenly Father grow me into a leader worth following. Lead me to lead like Jesus

Article contribution by: Deanna Trujillo (ELP Representative – Pensacola Women’s Home)

ELP Level II – Sep 2014

Welcome

This month we welcome Adam Holderread (TC Ozark’s) to the Level II! Welcome Adam we look forward to the rich insights you’ll bring to the group and our growing together as leaders.

Core Courses

Our core course this month is Ethics and Integrity and our text: Integrity by Dr. Henry Cloud. Integrity—more than simple honesty, is the key to success. A person with integrity has the ability to pull everything together, to make it all happen no matter how challenging the circumstances. In Integrity, he explores the six qualities of character that define integrity, and how people with integrity:

  • Are able to connect with others and build trust
  • Are oriented toward reality
  • Finish well
  • Embrace the negative
  • Are oriented toward increase
  • Have an understanding of the transcendent

Integrity is not something that you either have or don’t, but instead is an exciting growth path that all of us can engage in and enjoy.

Your first post will be up on the forum on Monday, September 15th.