CONTAGIOUS ATTITUDE

We could all probably muster up images of any number of movies where people are in bio-hazard suits to protect them from something contagious. We also probably can all think of someone we’ve been around where we wished we had better protection from the negative energy that had an effect on us. Or maybe it’s been ourselves that displayed a poor attitude to others. Either way, a leader’s attitude has a substantial impact on everyone around them.

Peter Stark stated, “One of the greatest gifts a leader can bring to a team is self-awareness and an understanding of their attitude and the impact it plays on relationships, the performance of their team, and everyone around them.” In the Southeast Region, we believe that having a Contagious Attitude means being people of optimism and belief—positive through every situation and full of confidence that we will succeed. Henry Ford said, “Whether you think you can, or think you can’t, you’re right.”

As we look at our mission to Put Hope Within Reach, the only way we will accomplish this is by attacking every obstacle with optimism and belief. If you really think about it, it’s impossible to have belief and not optimism, or to have optimism and not belief. They go hand in hand. What would it look like on our campuses if every obstacle were approached with the attitude of, “We can do this!” instead of “There’s no way this is possible!” What would it look like on our campuses if complaining was obsolete? What would it look like if camaraderie and teamwork created a momentum that nothing could stop? Our president Dr. Nance has stated, “Momentum allows you to make a few mistakes, because your momentum allows you to only observe the mistake for a short time and then it’s behind you. Without momentum you get to see your mistake for a long time and it takes too much of your time and attention. Momentum is the greatest friend a leader has.”

I believe that we can have such a positive culture in Teen Challenge, that it would be impossible for anyone to come in contact with us and not know they experienced something different. Let’s let our positive attitudes impact everyone around us!

Article written by: Dan Williams

Training Facilitator Highlight – May 2017

Name: John Arnold

Age: 26

Hometown: Manitou, KY

Teen Challenge Center: Graduated from Shenandoah Valley Teen Challenge in 2015. Currently on staff at Teen Challenge Men’s Center, Dixon, KY.

Testimony: I had a great upbringing as a child in a supportive loving home but early in my teenage years chose to consume myself with the things of this world. I entered Teen Challenge in September of 2014 broken, depressed, desperate and addicted. During my 12 months at Teen Challenge, I encountered God and He revealed Himself to me like never before. It is 100% His credit for the changes He has helped me make in my life and continue to make daily. I am extremely grateful that He restored me and am excited for the future He has for me.

Romans 12:1 – Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship.

What do you enjoy most about your role? I enjoy being able to firsthand witness God impacting others’ lives the same way He impacted mine. It’s humbling to be in a position to help lead others to new levels of leadership and discipleship.

What do you feel that leadership and training are valuable? Leadership training is essential for the Kingdom to expand! We all have to teach and learn from one another to more effectively carry out our purpose for Him.

CULTURE – Fight For It!

We have been experiencing change as an organization. As a leadership team we have been looking down the road and planning for the future, but before any of that could happen we knew that we had to adjust our culture as a region. It is time to align!

We have identified that we will have these values as an organization:

-Courageous Leadership

-Contagious Attitude

-Continuous Improvement

In the book, You Win in the Locker Room First, author Mike Smith makes it clear that culture is important and worth fighting for. He writes about coming into the Falcons Organization, ready to focus in on the culture from top to bottom. He spent time with every group of employee’s from the players, owner and senior staff all the way to the food service people and custodians. He said, “I’ve always believed that culture is defined and created from the top down, but it comes to life from the bottom up.”

I have always been a big believer that we all own the responsibility for the culture around us. I have charged many students and staff through the years to be “culture changers” or “to bring a good culture with them” wherever they go. Basically, we all own the responsibility of our culture at every level of leadership.

In a recent meeting, Brice Maddock, explained that our culture is defined by what we create, but also what we allow. I believe this is a charge to fight for our organizational culture. He went on to say, “We must commit ourselves to build a great culture – we must build it, live it, value it, reinforce it, and fight for it.

We get to be a part of an amazing move of God that is literally saving lives and restoring them. What we do on a daily basis has an eternal value. Own the culture around you, do your part to live out the 3 C’s and we will see God do amazing things through us all!

Article Written by: Dustin Nance

Source – You Win in the Locker Room First, by Jon Gordon and Mike Smith – Chapter 1

Training Facilitator Highlight

Name:  Samantha White     

Age:  27

Hometown: Bristol, CT

Teen Challenge Center:  Jacksonville Teen Challenge Women’s Center

Brief Testimony: I’ve been walking with the Lord since I was a young girl, and I don’t regret it for a moment. He’s currently showing me that He is after each and every crevice of my heart, no matter how small, He wants it all. I’ve been with this ministry for close to 5 years now and I love being able to represent His love and grace in the lives of others, and I’m so thankful for the opportunity to do so.

What do you enjoy most about your role?  Seeing the ladies challenged to grow and seeing them walk out what God has illuminated to them.

Why do you feel that leadership and training are valuable?  Without training, without growth, we would stay in a stagnant place and that’s not what God is calling us to. Leadership, true biblical leadership, leaves a lasting positive impact on others and that’s what I want my ELP students to walk away with.

 

“Response-Ability”

Greetings to our Emerging Leader family! The last month of 2016 is upon us, and I believe you would agree with me that it has indeed flown by. Hopefully we can have a moment to look back on 2016-it’s challenges, hardships, accomplishments, and learn from it. Also, we can look back and be encouraged by God’s faithfulness. Nevertheless, our mission of Putting Hope Within Reach drives us forward into 2017.

Recently, Dr. Jerry Nance spoke on “Personal Responsibility” here at our Headquarters. We were challenged and encouraged, gaining further insight into personal responsibility. He shared a small paragraph from Dr. Frank Thomas in his teaching:

Personal capital is closely related to personal responsibility, when personal responsibility is defined as a person’s “response-ability,” that is, the ability of a person to maturely respond to the various challenges and circumstances of life. Personal capital is also closely connected with character, when character is defined as a person’s moral or ethical quality, and the character of a person gives them advantages to respond to the challenges of life. Personal capital, then, is the inner resources, assets, and advantages of personal responsibility and character that one brings to the challenges and circumstances of life. When personal capital is low, a person is a victim of circumstances, at the effect of life and not able to consciously and purposefully choose his or her own thoughts, feelings and actions. Victims typically identify themselves based upon attributes of powerlessness, dependency, entitlement, apathy, worry, fear, self-doubt, and the like. The victim lives at the effect of what happens around them and has little personal capital to, in response to the challenges of life, choose and direct life’s direction and destiny.  

In our context, working with people on the path to life transformation, these truths are monumental for our students to grasp. But from a leadership standpoint, where can we continue to grow in character, growing our “response-ability?” If character and our “personal-capital” are running low in our lives, how can we then fill our tanks? I believe it is coming back to the beginning, the headwaters of our calling and identity in Christ, knowing that we said “Yes” to Christ and His calling as Emerging Leaders. We must be responsible for our thinking, decisions, departments, and our students.

If we model the victim mentality, our lives will fall short of success, and so will our students’ lives. However, if we respond to life’s challenges with moral character, Christ will be modeled to our students. After all, Christ was the greatest example of personal responsibility. I encourage and challenge us all to continue to be leaders of integrity, character and conviction, responding to life’s challenges with maturity, owning our choices and lives, and responding positively when things happen that are out of our control. Remember, we have a young generation that “listens with its eyes”. How we walk through life makes a difference on those that look up to us as leaders.

In closing, as we move forward into 2017, let us continue to pray and lift up our leaders, as they work towards implementing change, growth and improvement throughout our entire region! May God richly bless you with grace as you teach and live the gospel at each of our amazing locations this month. And of course…Merry Christmas!

Written by: Dan Williams

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