Success in the Arena – Leaving a Legacy

 

In honor of the Super Bowl, last month’s article was on The Arena.  The Arena is the placePeyton Manning where legends are born- legends like Peyton Manning.  Most of you know that Peyton just retired from football, after eighteen years of hard work and dedication.  The Denver Post printed an article covering the story called, Peyton Manning’s Legacy Will Need to Be Told By Others. Here is an excerpt from that article,

“At Manning’s retirement ceremony…the final question was in regard to Peyton’s footprint revolutionizing the position of quarterback, and what impact he would have on future quarterbacks. He responded: ‘I can’t answer that myself…’ Peyton would decline to define his legacy. That delineation of influence will be left up to millions of other people…”

Success in the arena has many aspects but, when thinking about the subject, two things really came to my mind.  The first aspect is summed up by this quote from an anonymous author, “Success isn’t just about what you accomplish in your life, it’s about what you inspire others to do.”  Many of you have experienced success in this area.  Whether you have inspired a student to be the father or mother that God had called them to be or an intern to work for a cause that helps others or maybe you have inspired your own son or daughter to follow in your ministry footprints- success has to do with what you influence others to do- this is an important part of your legacy and those that you have inspired, will tell your story.

Secondly, success in the arena has to do, not just with personal “wins,” but with team wins as well.  Read Manning’s definition of success in the arena, “When I look back on my NFL career, I’ll know without a doubt that I gave everything I had to help my teams walk away with a win.”

This is a challenge to all of us- are we doing everything we can so that our team wins?  Yes, we want personal success and legacy but there is nothing more inspiring than seeing a team play for team success.  It brings great glory to God when His people work together for a common cause and a common victory.  When this happens, no one man gets accolades; the accolades rest at the throne of God.

How do we manage this kind of legacy?  How do we gain the success that inspires others and brings both personal and team victories?  Read what Peyton is quoted as saying, “There were other players who were more talented, but there was no one who could out-prepare me. And, because of that, I have no regrets.”

Peyton Manning was not the most talented quarterback the NFL has ever seen but he arguable was the most prepared.  I want to challenge you today to prepare for success.  The most important and effective way to do this is through prayer and the study of God’s Word.  When we put on the full armor of God, we are prepared to expect, fight and win the daily battles that rage in our lives.  As we focus on preparing for success, we will inspire others, see victories in our lives and in the lives of our teammates. It is then we will leave a legacy for others and we will say, like Paul, “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith.” 2 Timothy 4:7

In the Arena Together,

Brice Maddock  (COO, Teen Challenge Southeast)

 

 

Enrich Culture – More than a Mission

We continue in our “E5” season of “Enriching Culture”. It might not seem very strategic to you, I mean there are places to go and drug addicts to save. We’re on a mission here. Is all this “culture stuff” really necessary? I’d like to propose that after cultivating a life of prayer, the most important thing a leader can do is build a healthy, flourishing culture for the teams they leadSure, ultimately leadership and team is about results – accomplishing tasks, goals and the mission.In Teen Challenge, we’re all sold out to the mission of offering life-transformation through Christ, so what difference does culture make?

Imagine two row boats in a race: boat #1 has 10 rowers vigorously rowing in sync, in the TC Crew Logo - Trimmed -TBsame direction, cheering each other on. Boat #2 has 5 rowers rowing in the same direction (but not quite in sync and not quite all out), 2 rowers who are arguing about which direction to row, 1 rower who is asleep, 1 rower who is rowing in the opposite direction, and 1 rower who is trying to sink the boat. Which boat wins? Culture is the single factor that will determine what is happening in your boat. A healthy culture is like the fertile soil that yields a hundred-fold at harvest time, like the firm foundation a lasting structure is built upon, or like the careful planning that makes a long journey more productive. Culture is the sole responsibility of the leader – you will either build a healthy culture by intention, or allow a dysfunctional culture by default. People will get in the boat because of the mission, but they’ll get out (or get tossed overboard) if the culture is not healthy. People don’t leave organizations or missions, they leave leaders. Bill Hybels, senior leader of Willowcreek Church, says, “staff cultures will only be as healthy as the senior leader wants it to be.” A healthy culture ensures that the right people are on the boat, that they find the best seat for their gifts and strengths, that all the rowers are synced up and rowing in the same direction, that every rower is fully engaged because they show up every day exclaiming, “I was born for this! I can’t imagine doing anything else! This is what makes me feel alive!” And a healthy culture gets results.

Like the example of the two row boats above, it’s astonishing how much more productive a flourishing culture is from a dysfunctional or toxic culture. Has God called you to lead? Then He’s called you to be a culture-bearer, to build and enrich a strong and healthy team culture. There’s no short cut in cultivating culture, it takes time and effort and skill. But it will lay the foundation and create the momentum that will save much time and effort in the long run. In the upcoming series of articles, we’ll see that enriching culture is actually pretty practical, and we’ll look at how leaders enrich culture as well as reasons why leaders don’t place an importance on culture. In the meantime, how are things in your boat?

Written by: Karissa Corpeny (Director of Corporate Training, TC Southeast)