Level II Link – Nov 2015

Welcome!

This month we welcome Brett Cooper, Bryan Sampson and Chris Thomas (Central Florida) and Lyle Copenhaver (Jacksonville) to the Level II! Welcome guys! We look forward to see how God will grow you as a leader and give you greater responsibility.

Core Courses

Those of you who are finishing up your final course for People First, remember to mail or fax (706-534-0462) your Personal Action Plans (PAP) at the end of each chapter. I’ll grade these and send back to you.

Our core course this month is Strategic Planning and Decision-making and our text: Executive Values by Kurt Senske. In this course you will leave with a game plan for Exec Values PICChrist-centered leadership that stresses the development of a healthy organizational culture, values-based strategic planning, mentoring, and balancing professional and personal lives.

Your first post will be up on the forum Monday, November 16th. You’ll make an initial post and respond to someone’s post.

Elective Track

Congratulations Becca Price (Women at the Well, PA) for moving on to your electives!

The Potential of Leadership

If you’ve been around the ELP long enough you know that we can’t use John Maxwell’s
quote often enough: “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” Leadership holds great responsibility and it wields sobering power, for good or bad. It has the ability to shape ideologies and cultures, influence the destinies of people, and rally people around a common cause or organize people to accomplish huge things. Ken Blanchard’s definition of leadership is still my favorite: “the capacity to influence others by unleashing their power and potential to impact the greater good.” Of course leadership can impact the greater bad as well…and that’s what we love to see at Teen Challenge, a person’s leadership capacity re-directed from a negative influence to a positive influence through Christ.

This year in the ELP newsletter we’ll be exploring the awesome potential of leadership toRedwood Hiking unleash the capacity within people, impact the greater good, and bring glory to God! And we’re going to look to a tree as our example. Not just any tree, but the giant Redwoods of northern California. If you’ve never seen these trees you’ve probably heard about their staggering size and seemingly eternal life-span. But this isn’t just about the American tendency to get caught up in the “biggest” and “oldest” and “best”, this isn’t about leadership impact based on the number of people you lead, the size of organization you run, or the length of time you’ve been a leader. This is about the God-given capacity each of us has been entrusted with. This is about wanting our lives to impact the greatest good and bring God as much glory as possible by unleashing this capacity to its fullest. So there’s no comparison game here, we’re only responsible to develop the unique capacity God has measured out to each of us. So if you don’t know a lot about Redwoods, let me attempt to paint the picture.

I had the opportunity to visit the Redwoods in 2006 and had an encounter I wasn’t expecting. These trees were grand beyond description, like the Queen of Sheba going to visit Solomon and saying, ‘the half had not been told.’ I felt I had truly entered another world, another realm or another time. I couldn’t take a walk among these trees without constantly pausing, jaw dropped and imagination conflicted, contemplating the girth and mass of the trunks, neck strained in an unsuccessful attempt to view the tops of the trees. It is impossible for the literature to exaggerate in their descriptions of an encounter with these trees. Writers liberally borrow architectural, religious and mythical vocabulary which still seems to fall short in communicating their “other-worldliness”.  R. A. Rasp says, “The hushed atmosphere of a cathedral redwood forest engenders feelings of awe and reverence. An ambience of gigantism humbles the mind but enriches the spirit.” These trees can grow more than 350’ in height (that’s like a 35 story building…) and up to 22’ in diameter, and somewhere in these forests are trees that were seedlings when Jesus walked the earth.

When I returned home after my time in the Redwoods, it hit me that what I once would have considered to be a mature stand of trees now looked like mere shrubs! An old oak tree, a giant relative to its setting, was no longer as impressive. The thought came to me: what if the lives we are living are mere shrubbery as well? Suppose God intended something far grander for His creation? While learning about these trees at the various National Park visitor centers, I felt like I had read about this place somewhere before. These trees were flourishing in a landscape that sounded very similar to a landscape described in the first few pages of Genesis before the account of the flood in Chapter 6. Walking among these trees felt like a glimpse of Eden, felt like you could once again literally walk with God in the cool of the day. In the wake of Adam and Eve’s fall, as they were escorted to the county line of Eden, certainly the reality must have hit hard when they saw the sign that said, “Leaving Eden, Now Entering Shrubberyville.” We’ve had a sense of restlessness with Shrubberyville ever since, but we’ve settled because it’s all we’ve ever known, all we ever thought there was. Maybe we’ve convinced ourselves to be content with lives that only seem big because we had no other reference point. In the book Rising Above, Wayne Cordeiro says, “God is not concerned that we will dream too big. He is more concerned that we will settle for far too little.”

The Redwoods tell me that we haven’t yet envisioned the fullness of what God intended for us and what He intends to accomplish through us. He knows us so well, has created us so uniquely, and has a journey that is hand-tailored for us, for our joy and His glory! Join me as we learn leadership lessons from the mighty Redwood and grow in our capacity and unleash our potential and the potential of those we have the privilege of influencing. Let’s let Jesus get all that He died for!

They have no speech, they use no words; no sound is heard from them. Yet their voice goes out into all the earth, their words to the ends of the world.”   – Psalm 19:3-4

Article contributed by: Karissa Corpeny (Director of Corporate Training, TCSE)

 

Enrich Culture – Getting the Right People on the Bus

Author Jim Collins says that people who aren’t a good fit for an organization’s values figures-368751_1280and culture get “ejected like a virus”. In creating a healthy organization, one of the roles of a leader is to set the culture of a team or organization, and then do the hard work of identifying and hiring people who are a right fit for the culture. Collins goes on to say, “first, get the right people on the bus, and then get them in the right seats.” Getting the right people on the bus means bringing people onto the team who embrace and embody the organization’s purpose, history, DNA, values, etc. The gifts and skills they bring and the role they can fill is secondary. It doesn’t mean that people who aren’t a right fit are bad people, or that they aren’t called and passionate to serve God, it just means that they’re called somewhere else. When a leader makes a rushed hiring decision because they need to “plug a hole”, it does a disservice not only to the team but to the person who should be serving and flourishing elsewhere. A person who is on the wrong bus ends up disillusioned and the team ends up frustrated. The leader has to spend more time in the long run fixing the mistakes of a poor hiring decision while doing the work of re-hiring.

The book, The Leadership Pipeline offers the following insight: “Managers quickly learn how to hire people with the talent and experience to do a given job properly; they find it more difficult to hire people who ‘fit’ a company’s work values and practices.” Good hiring decisions simply take time and effort. Have more than one conversation with the person, describe (candidly…) what it would be like to serve with the organization and with their potential team, does that sound like a bus they’d like to be on for a long journey? Get to know the interviewee’s passion, gifting, vision, and the values they are already living out. Does this align with the organization? Use any relevant assessments or hiring tools and be sure to call the references, what is their appraisal of this person’s fit? Again in The Leadership Pipeline, the authors make the case that good hiring practices are a skillset that every leader should value and make time for: “The most difficult change for first-time managers to make involves values. Specifically, they need to learn to value managerial work rather than just tolerate it. They must believe that making time for others, planning, coaching, and the like [hiring…] are necessary tasks and are their responsibility. More than that, they must view this other-directed work as mission-critical…” Due diligence won’t prevent every hiring mistake, but it will prevent many of them. It will save everyone a lot of heartache and go a long way in creating a healthy team and culture. Not only that, but the right staff hired today become the “seed bed” from which tomorrow’s leaders are selected from!

In the hiring process, the leader should not only be thinking of their immediate needs, but the organization’s future. If you have a responsibility for hiring, how have you been doing in that area? What could you do better? If not, think about some of the past hiring experiences you’ve been through, what went well and what went wrong? How will you shape your philosophy in this area when given the opportunity for this leadership responsibility?

Article contribution by: Karissa Corpeny  (Director of Corporate Training, TC Southeast)

 

Enrich Culture – More than a Mission

We continue in our “E5” season of “Enriching Culture”. It might not seem very strategic to you, I mean there are places to go and drug addicts to save. We’re on a mission here. Is all this “culture stuff” really necessary? I’d like to propose that after cultivating a life of prayer, the most important thing a leader can do is build a healthy, flourishing culture for the teams they leadSure, ultimately leadership and team is about results – accomplishing tasks, goals and the mission.In Teen Challenge, we’re all sold out to the mission of offering life-transformation through Christ, so what difference does culture make?

Imagine two row boats in a race: boat #1 has 10 rowers vigorously rowing in sync, in the TC Crew Logo - Trimmed -TBsame direction, cheering each other on. Boat #2 has 5 rowers rowing in the same direction (but not quite in sync and not quite all out), 2 rowers who are arguing about which direction to row, 1 rower who is asleep, 1 rower who is rowing in the opposite direction, and 1 rower who is trying to sink the boat. Which boat wins? Culture is the single factor that will determine what is happening in your boat. A healthy culture is like the fertile soil that yields a hundred-fold at harvest time, like the firm foundation a lasting structure is built upon, or like the careful planning that makes a long journey more productive. Culture is the sole responsibility of the leader – you will either build a healthy culture by intention, or allow a dysfunctional culture by default. People will get in the boat because of the mission, but they’ll get out (or get tossed overboard) if the culture is not healthy. People don’t leave organizations or missions, they leave leaders. Bill Hybels, senior leader of Willowcreek Church, says, “staff cultures will only be as healthy as the senior leader wants it to be.” A healthy culture ensures that the right people are on the boat, that they find the best seat for their gifts and strengths, that all the rowers are synced up and rowing in the same direction, that every rower is fully engaged because they show up every day exclaiming, “I was born for this! I can’t imagine doing anything else! This is what makes me feel alive!” And a healthy culture gets results.

Like the example of the two row boats above, it’s astonishing how much more productive a flourishing culture is from a dysfunctional or toxic culture. Has God called you to lead? Then He’s called you to be a culture-bearer, to build and enrich a strong and healthy team culture. There’s no short cut in cultivating culture, it takes time and effort and skill. But it will lay the foundation and create the momentum that will save much time and effort in the long run. In the upcoming series of articles, we’ll see that enriching culture is actually pretty practical, and we’ll look at how leaders enrich culture as well as reasons why leaders don’t place an importance on culture. In the meantime, how are things in your boat?

Written by: Karissa Corpeny (Director of Corporate Training, TC Southeast)

 

Yoked up with Jesus

While doing my devotions this morning the Lord reminded me of this well known scripture in John 15:4-5 “Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself unless it abides in the vine, so neither can you unless you abide in Me. I am the vine, you are the branches; he who abides in Me and I in him, he bears much fruit, for apart from Me you can do nothing.” (NASB). Another version says “I am the Vine, you are the branches. When you’re joined with me and I with you, the relation intimate and organic, the harvest is sure to be abundant. Separated, you can’t produce a thing.” (TM). Years ago I read a little book by Bruce Wilkinson Secrets of the Vine. The entire book speaks to what happens when we remain connected and yoked-up with Christ.

Abiding goes deeper than a superficial “hi” or “hello, nice to see you” relationship. It speaks to remaining, dwelling – to continue in lasting relationship with someone. When we are joined in intimate, organic relationship with Christ we grow and bear much, more fruit. Practicing God’s presence (consistently connecting with Him in the holy place) is essential for us as spiritual coaches. When we are joined with Christ, He gives us spiritual intelligence and insights to care for the students and emerging leaders as He would. Apart from this, we will not produce sons and daughters who remain.

Recall our acronym responsibility:

Recruitdownload
Equip and Train
Spirit-filled
P
raying
O
ptimistic
N
ext-Generation Leaders
who lead Self well
I
nfluence others
B
uy into our vision
I
nvest time and resources
L
ove the Lost
I
nspire others to action
T
reat others with dignity

And are Yoked-up with a mentor/coach

Our desire is to raise up the next generation of leaders who are yoked up with Christ and are responsible to the call on their lives. In closing I want us to reflect on 3 questions:

  1. How can I improve the quality of my relationship with the Lord?
  2. What situation(s) am I facing that requires spiritual intelligence that only God can help with?
  3. How can I model being yoked-up with Christ to my ESL’s?

Responsibility – Love the Lost

Let’s recap, so far our acronym “Responsibility

Recruit
hunter.praying Equip and Train
Spirit-filled
Praying
Optimistic
Next-Generation Leaders
who lead Self well
Influence others
Buy into our vision
Invest time and resources
Love the Lost

God ignited a fire in our hearts last week, let’s keep that fire burning. How about starting your own ELP “Take the City” project or a “TC-HOP” (IHOP) with Harp and Bowl Worship and prayer at your Center?

When David Wilkerson ministered to the gangs on the streets of New York in 1958, he met Nicky Cruz, assistant to the president of the Mau Mau gang, who told him after a time of preaching and ministry “Go to Hell, Preacher.” But David’s response was “you don’t think much of me Nicky, but I feel different about you; I love you Nicky.” Nicky said ” you come near me Preacher and I’ll kill you.” David was moved with great compassion, gentleness and patience  and these words rolled off his tongue “you could cut me in a thousand pieces and lay them out in the street and every piece would love you” (C&S, p. 72). This is the depth of love our students need. Our students come to us because nobody loves them. Most of them did not experience unconditional love from their mother or father while they were growing up therefore they searched for love in all the wrong places. It is the unconditional love that we received through Jesus Christ that will make the difference in our students’ lives. Prior to their encounter with God, all they knew was conditional love but we can show them the unconditional love of God when they walk through our doors.

Last Saturday while we did our Take the City outreach, I realized how much the enemy is using drugs and lies to blind the eyes of people from receiving God’s love. When we invited one lady to leave her lifestyle and come with us to our Women’s Center, she said “I can’t do that to my “family” (other addicts). I confronted her with the question; “on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the highest, how much do you love your friends? 10. When asked the same question about God she responded “I can’t say that, I don’t even want to say that.” Although she professed to know God and pray to Him every day, she realized she loved her friends more than she loved God.

As staff we have to model unconditional love for our students. As Christ has loved us, so also we must love one another (John 13:34, NIV). David Wilkerson came to the realization years ago that “they’ve (drug addicts) got to start over again, and they’ve got to be surrounded by love” (C&S, p. 60). Pray that God gives you a burden for the 250 million drug addicts all over the world and ask Him how we can bring hope within reach of every addict.

Blessings, Andree
ELP Training coach

RESPONSIBILITY – Invest in others

Let’s recap, so far our acronym “Responsibility6225794911_36db2f373f_z
Recruit
Equip and Train
Spirit-filled
Praying
Optimistic
Next Generation Leaders
who lead Self well
Influence others
Buy into our vision
Invest time and resources

Invest is a peculiar concept because oftentimes we say we believe in something or someone but if we are not invested in that thing or person, it’s difficult to really measure the extent of our belief or the value we place on them. An investment is sowing – planting that which was not there before. J. Thorp says “leaders attract followers who are committed to achieving desired outcomes of an organization and therefore willing to invest themselves into the purpose” hall@wpc.net. In the same way when we invest in our emerging leaders, we plant seeds of our organization’s mission, values, vision, strategies through our time, counsel, coaching, training and finances to motivate them to achieve the desired outcomes of both the organization and the emerging leader.  John Maxwell on a Minute with Maxwell shared “when you sow, you don’t reap immediately and you don’t dig up the seed that you plant to look to see if it’s growing, you have to be patient.” Firstly you sow a seed then water it, nurture it, expose it to the natural environs and let it grow organically.

As the ELP Rep, I challenge you to invest (devout) your time, talents and resources in the emerging leaders to accomplish their calling and the organization’s purpose. In so doing we can create a culture which seeks to stimulate the growth and development of others, our organization, and ourselves. The greatest measure of our success is the seeds we sow through quality time and resources which we spend in building relationships rather than the harvest we will reap. As the father of servant leadership (Robert Greenleaf) asked “Do those served grow as persons? Do they, while being served, become healthier, wiser, freer, more autonomous, more likely themselves to become servants?”

“We don’t accomplish anything in this world alone…and whatever happens is the result of the whole tapestry of one’s life and all the weavings of individual threads from one to another that creates something.”

~ Sandra Day O’Connor

Blessings, Andree

ELP Training coach

Buy Into Our Vision

Buy into” according to dictionary.com means “to be in unison, assent with another” (http://thesaurus.com/browse/buy+into).   In our 19 Days of Prayer e-memos we have been looking at the strands of the TC DNA and what these mean. The ELP is intentionally drilling down to the type of leader (sons/daughters) we want to raise up.  Yes, they should be servant leaders, they must have the Teen Challenge DNA (Earnest Prayer, Dependence on the Holy Spirit, Discipleship and the Jesus Factor, Exemplary Leadership, Personal Responsibility and Faith) and also, buy into our vision and strategy, the EFIVE.

sky-diving teamwork teen challenge elp

The challenge of every leader, new pastor and new business owner is to build a team of staff who buy into the vision you have for the future of your organization” (Dr. J Nance – From Dream to Reality).  Dr. J describes how he got the first staff to buy into his vision for TC FL:

The needs of the staff were overwhelming, and I knew we could not take the ministry beyond the development of the staff.  The biggest challenge was earning their trust and getting them to believe in me and in the goals I had for Teen Challenge. Through those intentional staff days we trained, taught them the vision and I was able to win their respect through spending time with them and caring for their positions within Teen Challenge.  These people could be transformed into a winning, faith-filled team with vision.

He created buy-in through his exemplary leadership, teaching and coaching. How will we get our Emerging Leaders to buy into our vision? Dr. J’s response “we build leaders through relationship building.”

“People don’t first follow worthy causes; they follow worthy leaderswho promote causes they can believe in”

 – John Maxwell

Blessings, Andree

Emerging Leaders Program Coach

Responsibility- To Self

Let’s recap, so far our acronym “Responsibility“:

(Click here to read the other articles in the Series)

Recruit
Equip and Train
Spirit-filled
Praying
Optimistic
Next Generation Leaders
who lead Self well

As you know, the Level I curriculum focuses heavily on self-leadership because we believe we lead ourselves first before we seek to lead others.  In this edition, I will draw heavily onHabitudes 1 “The Art of Self-Leadership” by Dr. Tim Elmore. Elmore says “leaders realize they are drivers – and are responsible for their attitudes and destination in life.” Being a driver is about taking responsibility for yourself and those under your care – taking ownership. “Individuals who don’t want to take responsibility have a victim mind-set; they are passengers in life.” However, when things go wrong, leaders are determined to remain drivers by taking responsibility for their attitudes, how they respond to problems and the direction of their lives.

Driving Pic

The role of the Rep is to coach the emerging leader to lead themselves well. Our student leaders are prone to fall short because they are not coached on how to manage themselves well. They have not developed the character to do what’s right even if they don’t feel like it, they are not secured in their identity in Christ and, in the busyness of life and work, our Core Values are not assessed against decisions.  As Reps, let us look for those coaching openings/opportunities to help our emerging leaders grow.  Identify those gaps in character, help them set SMART goals and execute plans which will move them from making excuses and default patterns to taking responsibility for their lives.

Blessings, Andree