ELP Summit_Staff Day

We are exactly one month out from our ELP Summit_Staff Day scheduled for August 15-18 at Lakeside Retreat and Event Center. If you have not already registered yourself and your emerging leaders for this event, registration will close on July 15th, so go ahead and register here.  Look out for our final e-memo in a few weeks which will give you final details on what to bring.

 

Dr. J Graduation KeynotePutting Hope Within Reach 4Global night 4Boat race

2016 ELP Summit_Staff Day

We’re just about two months out from our ELP Summit_Staff Day, August 15 -18, 2016. Our theme is “think simple, Dream Big.” We are keeping the simple things important while dreaming about how we can “Put Hope Within Reach of Every Addict.”  The three-strand cord of “Rebuilding the Altar,” “Raising up Sons” and “Put Hope Within Reach” were words spoken to Dr. J over the last few years. As we create structures and systems to accomplish our vision, we are mindful of the tension to simplify, simplify, simplify while we dream BIG, BIG, BIG!

We have some great speakers line up and several break-out sessions that we hope will help you practically work smarter while having vision for yourself and the organization. If you haven’t already registered, please register yourself and your participants here.

Looking forward to see you there!

Think Simple Dream Big

 

ELP Highlight – Aug 2015

Name: Joyce A. DavisJoyce TC AZ

Role: Kitchen Coordinator

Center: Tucson Teen Challenge, Men’s Induction Center

I was approached by my dear friend and co-worker Patrice Bloom to participate in the ELP Program for the Tucson Teen Challenge Men’s Induction Center.  Without telling Patrice, I thought, “No way will I participate in a program that requires hours and hours of study.  I am too busy and way too old to take on anything else.”

After speaking at length with Patrice, she explained why it would be beneficial for me to complete this course of study.  Well, needless to say, when I realized that completing the program would allow me to have a better understanding of our students and another way for me to serve in a “Servant Leadership” position.  That was the pivotal point for me.  I love our students as God instructs – without rhyme or reason – I love them and want to assist students and/or staff in any way possible.

I want to be the best “representative” for our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, as well as for Teen Challenge.  Completing the ELP Program gave me additional tools, information and Biblical knowledge to be a better Leader for Teen Challenge.  The program also put me in a better position to “step up to the plate” for Jesus Christ.  I now think about how I can help in any situation.  I have always been a “team player, leader & doer”.  But after completing the ELP Program I have taken the job of “team player, leader & doer” to a whole new level.

I am very thankful that Patrice thought enough of me to allow me this opportunity.

 

 

 

Enrich Culture – Developing People

In Teen Challenge we would say that we are “student-focused” – and we should be. However, sometimes a leader can be so student-focused that they look past the staff they are leading and, along with them, place most of their emphasis on the students. While a key leader may retain some aspects of student ministry, their primary ministry is to the people on the team they lead. And when a leader is growing and developing the people they lead, they can be sure the students will be growing and developing as well. So last month we looked at how a leader enriches culture through the practical skill of hiring the right people, this month we’ll look at the practical skill of developing people. Ken Blanchard, in his book “The Servant Leader”, says that a “key element of being a servant leader is to consider people’s development as an equal end goal as their performance.” Blanchard offers up a simple model for developing people with what he calls “Situational Leadership” and illustrates how Jesus was a Situational Leader. This model recognizes SLII-Color-Model-Exp_inprthat people are always on a development continuum based on 2 things: commitment and competence. When you started with Teen Challenge your commitment was high as you answered God’s call, but your competence was low because you’re new on the job, you have a lot to learn. Blanchard calls this an “enthusiastic beginner”. As you begin to learn your new role and experience challenges moving up the learning curve – maybe a student you’ve been counseling leaves the program – you may become a “disillusioned learner” as your commitment wavers. You may ask, am I really cut out for this? But as you continue to grow in competence, you reaffirm your commitment and become a “capable but cautious performer”, ultimately becoming a “self-reliant achiever”. (In our context, let’s acknowledge we’re still God-reliant achievers…) The leader’s role with Situational Leadership is to first “diagnose” which development level applies to the person. Secondly they demonstrate “flexibility” in adjusting their leadership style to that development level. For an enthusiastic beginner, it’s ok to be “directive” in your leadership – the person is new, they need to know what to do and how to do it. For a disillusioned learner the leader shifts to a “coaching” style – asking great questions while still providing direction to get the staff member over this hump. As the staff becomes a capable but cautious performer they need a “supportive” leadership style – they can do the job, they just need to be affirmed. Finally, the leader can “delegate” to the self-reliant achiever – empowering them and releasing them to flourish in their role. After diagnosis and flexibility in leadership style, the third skill of a situational leader is “partnering for performance” – working with the staff member to identify goals and a plan for on-going development. As a leader, when you create a culture that intentionally develops people and learn the skills to do this well, you’ll retain great people, your team will flourish, and students will be well served. And, if you are a staff member, guess what? These same situational leadership principles apply as you disciple students – think about how they go through these development levels in the program and how you adjust your approach accordingly… This month, read one of the Gospels with these principles of development in mind, how was Jesus a situational leader?

Article Contributed by: Karissa Corpeny, Director of Corporate Training

References:

The Servant Leader” – Blanchard & Hodges

Leading at a Higher Level” – Blanchard