Level II

Welcome

This month we welcome Holly Williams to the Level II. Holly is a graduate of Ft. Myers TC and the Emerging Leaders College and is currently serving the ladies at Pensacola Women’s Home. Welcome Holly! Looking forward to see how God grows you and your leadership through the Level II.

Congratulations

Congratulations Elissa Hollingsworth for moving on to your electives!

 

Current Course

This month we start a new core course Strategic Planning and Decision-making and our text: Executive Values by Kurt Senske. Senske demonstrates how Christian values support long term organizational success. This original and practical guide provides Christian leaders with a game plan for Christ-centered leadership that stresses the development of a healthy organizational culture, values-based strategic planning, mentoring, and balancing professional and personal life. The staff will learn how to add lasting value to the ministry, employees, students, donors and to society at large.

Your first post will be up on the forum by Monday, August 15th.

ELP Summit_Staff Day

We are exactly one month out from our ELP Summit_Staff Day scheduled for August 15-18 at Lakeside Retreat and Event Center. If you have not already registered yourself and your emerging leaders for this event, registration will close on July 15th, so go ahead and register here.  Look out for our final e-memo in a few weeks which will give you final details on what to bring.

 

Dr. J Graduation KeynotePutting Hope Within Reach 4Global night 4Boat race

Rep’s Link

Welcome

This month we welcome new Rep’s Mike Spivey, Level I & II graduate from Jacksonville Men’s and Holly Williams Level I and ELC graduate and staff at Pensacola Women’s to the ELP. Thank you for answering the call to raise up the next generation of leaders within Teen Challenge.

Level I Adult

This month we start our new course Discover Your Gifts and our text: Discover Your God-given Gifts by Don and Katie Fortune. You will discover which of the seven motivational gifts listed in Romans 12:6-8 were given to you by our Heavenly Father at your birth. Why do you enjoy doing some things and do other things simply because they have to be done? These gifts are actually the key to understanding the very motivating forces in your life. You will understand the vast difference between the gifts of the Spirit, the gifts of Christ to the church and your personal, innate gifts you have had from birth.

Level I Adolescent

Our course for the Adolescent track is Leading Others and our text: HabHabitudes 3-FBitudes #3 – The Art of Leading Others by Dr. Tim Elmore. The images Dr. Elmore provides are memorable and powerful in conveying key leadership principles. We want to communicate to our students that in the ELP, leadership starts first with leading yourself well, then with connecting with others and finally, we lead those under our care.

Monthly Book Orders and Grades

Southeast region Rep’s can go to Google Drive and search for ELP Monthly Order Form and Grade Sheet Edited. Look for your center’s name in the tabs at the bottom and fill in your information. No need to save or email the spreadsheet (Google Drive saves it and we can access the info from my Drive). If you place an initial order on the form and update the order later (i.e. add 2 more books) after we have ordered your books, please send and email to andree.aiken@teenchallenge.cc. All new applications must be in by the 10th of the month for students starting the 15th.

3 Key Ingredients of a Coaching Conversation

Allowing our graduates to walk out their freedom in Christ while at Teen Challenge is necessary to prepare them to live successful Christian lives after TC. When a student first enters the program we tell them what to do because they are a new babe in Christ. As they become spiritually mature, we give them more responsibility to make decisions with the help of the Holy Spirit. This is key to helping our graduates transition back to society as productive citizens and where coaching is especially helpful in the discipleship process.

Being led by the Holy Spirit to ask the right questions at the right time of the right person

Two people having a conversation

Two people having a conversation

will help them develop the critical thinking skills necessary to adjust to life after TC. This will require several coaching conversations. A coaching conversation has three key ingredients which will move the person forward:

  1. Explores – connect with the students where they are at. Talk about the things they want to talk about. This is the student’s time to explore what’s inside of them and to have a simple conversation that will help them dream about the possibilities for their future.
  2. Excites – Get excited about  the things they are excited about. Excitement or joy is contagious and fires up the brain to create. If you are excited about their future, they are excited too and they will believe it’s possible to create. A joyful heart is good medicine.
  3. Exhorts – Be an Encourager – a Barnabas. Along the way, the student will meet upon obstacles which may prevent them from becoming who God created them to be. Your role is to encourage them to live from a stance of victory and not defeat. Encourage them to turn the trials into opportunities.

I have found that the best coaching conversations are in the moment – as you go about daily life on campus. You can draw out so much more when you are in a relaxed environment. Listen and watch for the moment to coach and ask these powerful questions:

What is here that you want to explore?
How does this fit with your plans and values?
What are you willing to do to accomplish this?
What support will you need along the way?
What is your desired outcome?

Article Submitted by: Andree Aiken, ELP Leader/Coach, TC Southeast

 

From the Rep’s Corner

Mentoring and Coaching – Investing in Others

Pouring in versus drawing out – that’s one of the simplest ways to differentiate between mentoring and coaching.

There is a time and a place for pouring into, or mentoring, others. Those who have more life experience, wisdom, and Biblical knowledge have a responsibility to pass on what they know to those who are younger, whether in age or faith. Paul’s word to Timothy was to “entrust to reliable people who will also be qualified to teach others” (2 Timothy 2:2).  Multiplication of disciples at its finest – tell them what I told you, so they can tell others!

Mentoring says, “I love you enough to give you everything that I have. I want to see you succeed; here’s what I know to help you do that.”

Life Coaching, on the other hand, says, “I believe you have what it takes to figure this out. I love you enough to listen and give you my full attention while you talk through this and create your own plan of action and change.”

Coaches use open-ended questions to draw out what a person has in them. Additionally, Christian coaches rely on the principles that God initiates change and that His sheep hear His voice. Coaching keeps the responsibility for growth and change with the coachee. Though asking and listening takes more time than telling, the impact is powerful.

Within the ministry of Teen Challenge, both mentoring and coaching have their place. Both say to students, interns and staff, “I’m invested in you.” They just say it differently.

Ask yourself:

  • Who in my realm of influence would benefit from mentoring or coaching?
  • What is the impact of mentoring on a conversation? Of coaching on a conversation?
  • When is it most appropriate to use mentoring in your ministry? When is coaching most effective?
  • What’s one step you can take this month to grow in the disciplines of mentoring and/or coaching?

Article submitted by: Angela Hastings (ELP Rep/Coach, Hosanna House)

Rep’s Link – Oct 2015

Level I Adult

Our new course is Team Building and our text: 17 Essential Qualities of a Team Player by John Maxwell. In this course you will learn the personal characteristics necessary for becoming an effective team player. Maxwell outlines the success of team players who have been:

  • Intentional – making every action count toward a long-term goal
  • Relational – focused on others
  • Selfless – willing to take a subordinate role for the team
  • Tenacious – hardworking and optimistic in the face of setbacks

Level I Adolescent

Our course for the Adolescent track is Self-Leadership and our text: Habitudes I – the 51i+vfRPCtL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Art of Self-leadership  by Dr. Tim Elmore. We believe leadership is a 360-degree proposition. The leadership journey begins with self-leadership; we must lead ourselves before we lead anyone else.

Monthly Book Orders and Grades

Southeast region Rep’s can go to Google Drive and search for ELP Monthly Order Form and Grade Sheet Edited. Look for your center’s name in the tabs at the bottom and fill in your information. No need to save or email the spreadsheet (Google Drive saves it and we can access the info from my Drive). If you place an initial order on the form and update the order later (i.e. add 2 more books) after we have ordered your books, please send to me at andree.aiken@teenchallenge.cc. All new applications must be in by the 10th of the month for students starting the 15th.

ELP Highlight – Aug 2015

Name: Joyce A. DavisJoyce TC AZ

Role: Kitchen Coordinator

Center: Tucson Teen Challenge, Men’s Induction Center

I was approached by my dear friend and co-worker Patrice Bloom to participate in the ELP Program for the Tucson Teen Challenge Men’s Induction Center.  Without telling Patrice, I thought, “No way will I participate in a program that requires hours and hours of study.  I am too busy and way too old to take on anything else.”

After speaking at length with Patrice, she explained why it would be beneficial for me to complete this course of study.  Well, needless to say, when I realized that completing the program would allow me to have a better understanding of our students and another way for me to serve in a “Servant Leadership” position.  That was the pivotal point for me.  I love our students as God instructs – without rhyme or reason – I love them and want to assist students and/or staff in any way possible.

I want to be the best “representative” for our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, as well as for Teen Challenge.  Completing the ELP Program gave me additional tools, information and Biblical knowledge to be a better Leader for Teen Challenge.  The program also put me in a better position to “step up to the plate” for Jesus Christ.  I now think about how I can help in any situation.  I have always been a “team player, leader & doer”.  But after completing the ELP Program I have taken the job of “team player, leader & doer” to a whole new level.

I am very thankful that Patrice thought enough of me to allow me this opportunity.

 

 

 

Passing on the culture: Presence & Relationship

At our recent ELP Summit Dustin and Janel Nance shared how we, as the bridge generation, pass on a culture of presence and relationship. “We have to look at the past to remember that we are a part of a legacy.” David Wilkerson built a good foundation for TC by going to those boys, partnering with churches, fundraising, recruiting and training specialists and providing a home of hope for those boys. Teen Challenge has to be about Lamb Chop evangelism; real meat and substance; teaching our

I was working hard and wearing the ELP DNA shirt and gave Timmy a huge! thought you’d want to see me passing on DNA to our future leaders!

I was working hard and wearing the ELP DNA shirt and gave Timmy a hug! Thought you’d want to see me passing on DNA to our future leaders! ~ Dustin Nance

students to nurture a real love for Christ and a love for others. At ELC, Dustin and Janel creates a culture of relationship and living life with students. The decision to live in community meant they would live a transparent life before the students knowing the students would grow and they themselves would grow. “At the core of raising up sons and daughters is love. We love our students and we like them. They are our spiritual sons and daughters and they know that we love them even when it gets messy. We allow people to see the imperfect person we are, who love and who say “yes” to Jesus, and we teach them to hear the voice of God for themselves and to say “yes.” We want to raise up sons and daughters who are dependent on the Lord not dependent on us. Raising sons and daughters is not setting up policies for every infraction, it’s living life with people. The devil is not scared of dry bones (people following rules); he’s scared when there is life in them (people led by the spirit).

Characteristics of our Pioneer

Some of the characteristics of our pioneers are:

  1. They recognized that they were not owners but stewards of the vision. Prayer was all they had. Frank Reynolds said one of his greatest fears was that “we would think we know how to do it.” Because we don’t know how to do it, we are totally dependent on the Holy Spirit. He is the only one who can draw people to Christ.
  2. They did not put in human mechanisms to fix a spiritual problem. Jesus is the Program. What makes Teen Challenge different from other programs? It is the Jesus Factor. Jesus is the only one who can fill the deep void that our students feel. “We use God’s mighty weapons to capture rebels and bring them back to God and change them into men whose hearts’ desire is obedience to Christ” 2 Cor 10:5 (TLB).
  3. Stop screaming from the bleachers and get in the game. David Wilkerson
    photo 5 (1)

    Claude Mooneyhan (GTC) and Dustin Nance working with emerging leaders to build a section of the bridge at our Summit.

    started the first Teen Challenge in New York, Mike and Kay Zello did evangelism on the streets, Frank Reynolds started The Farm in Rehrersburg, Dave Batty developed the first curriculum. They all had skin in the game and they went to work. They were exemplary leaders who modeled servant leadership and raised up sons and daughters.

  4. Don’t lose the vision of reaching others. David never lost the vision to go and save those boys.  Keep in mind the vision ahead “to put hope within reach of every addict” and work hard at it. Ministry is a heavy load and we as the bridge generation have a responsibility to be strong, to be a people of integrity and to believe God for the miracles.

Excerpts from ELP Summit 2015 “The Bridge, Passing on the Culture: Presence & Relationship” by Dustin & Janel Nance.

 

Enrich Culture – Building a Cohesive Team – More than Mediocre

A leader who is intentional about setting the culture, hiring people who fit the culture, and developing those people, now has the ingredients for an amazing team! In physics, cohesion is the force by which molecules in a substance are held together. In this article we’ll look at the factors by which team members come together to form a cohesive team. The book we’re drawing from this month is “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team” by Patrick Lencioni – in this book, Lencioni outlines 5 keys to creating a healthy high-performing team. Each principle builds on the former, so let’s begin with the end in mind. The ultimate footballteampurpose of a team is to get “Results”. A sports team wants to win the game, a military unit wants to achieve the tactical objective, a corporate team wants to see profits, a married couple wants to raise children who become healthy adults, and a Teen Challenge staff team wants to see lives transformed. I love how Lencioni recounts of hearing people say, “well we have a losing record this season, but we have a great team!” He’ll say “no, you don’t have a great team; you have a group of people who enjoy being together and are satisfied with mediocre results.” You might say that Teen Challenge is God’s business and we can’t measure everything – the results are up to Him. That’s partly true, but from well executed fundraising events to well-maintained buildings to changed lives…there are plenty of results we want to see in Teen Challenge.

Next, a team gets results because they are willing to embrace “Accountability”. Greg Hammond talks about this principle in creating a “peer culture” in the student body. He uses the example of a time when he constantly found old gum on the sidewalks of the campus. He could have added yet another rule to the policy manual and said, “No gum.” Instead he went to the student body and said, “You decide – if you want to keep chewing gum, keep it off the sidewalks.” The students took care of it themselves by holding one another accountable. And this is what makes accountability effective, when it operates with “Commitment” to agreed upon decisions, objectives or courses of action. With this kind of commitment the team member says, “I’m all in and I will do my best to support this decision and see it succeed.”

While the gum chewing example is a simple one, other decisions and courses of action are not so straightforward – should this student be dismissed? How can we improve our admissions process? Can we disciple our students more effectively? This is where cohesive teams learn to be comfortable with “Healthy Conflict”. This is nothing more than the pursuit of truth – what’s the very best decision? Is there a better idea? What will be the most effective solution? When team members are free to weigh in on the discussion, and are willing to do so, it’s more likely that the best decision will be made because everyone has brought their brains, experience and giftings to the table. Healthy conflict doesn’t necessarily lead to consensus – the leader will often have to make the call – but people can usually commit to decisions they’ve been allowed to give input on even if they disagree. This kind of honest discussion can only happen in a healthy culture, where there is the presence of “Trust” on a team. Lencioni calls this “vulnerability-based trust”, where people can speak up or admit they don’t have all the answers without fear of being judged or shot down. This kind of trust takes time and intentionality to cultivate on a team but everything else depends on this foundation.

Next month we’ll take a closer look at the role of the leader in these 5 areas. In the meantime, how are things on your team? Is it healthy and functional? Or is there sometimes an inattention to results, avoidance of accountability, lack of commitment, fear of conflict, or absence of trust?

ELP Rep’s Link – Oct 2014

We want to welcome Kerry Pevey (transfer from Accounts Payable Dept. ) to theKerry. Pevey Corporate Training Team as the ELP Administrative Assistant. Kerry is a great addition to the team and will be taking over the Level I application processing and book orders. Go ahead and send all Level I applications to her attention.

Level I Adult 

This month we continue with our course Knowing and Understanding God’sExperiencingGod Will and our text is Experiencing God by Blackaby, Blackaby and King. Your students should be about half way into this course and are learning more about being still and watching where God is working and join Him in His work rather than doing and then inviting God to bless their efforts. Look for opportunities to affirm and celebrate your students when you see them practically applying the principles in the book.

Level I Adolescent

Our course for the Adolescent track is Discover Your God-given Gifts and our text: Congratulations…You’re Gifted! by Doug Fields & Erik Rees. Your students will discover the place where your God-given passions and strengths intersect, and you’ll find the way you’re designed to serve. With interactive exercises and questions for you to answer, you’ll learn more about your:

S-piritual Gifts

    H-eart

         A-bilities

              P-ersonality

                    E-xperiences

Monthly Book Orders and Grades

Southeast region Rep’s can go to Google Drive and search for ELP Monthly Order Form and Grade Sheet Edited. Look for your center’s name in the tabs at the bottom and fill in your center’s information. No need to save or email the spreadsheet (Google Drive saves it and I can access the info from my Drive). If you place an initial order on the form and update the order later (i.e. add 2 more books) after we have ordered your books, please send Kerry Pevey an email at kerry.pevey@teenchallenge.cc. Blessings!