Level II – Feb 2016

Welcome

This month we welcome Rhome Smith and Sean Soltero (Central FL Men’s) to the Level II!. Both leaders are graduates of Teen Challenge and TCIMI. Welcome guys! The Lord will grow your leadership and ask you to come up higher. Looking forward to walk this journey with you.

Core Courses

We are studying the course Practical Christianity and our text: Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald.

The values of our Western culture inclines us to believe that the busy, publicly-active person in ministry is also the most spiritual.  This course will guide you through practical spiritual disciplines which will assist in facing the daily challenges of being a disciple of Christ.  Topics include: prayer, journaling, and being a good steward of time and resources.  This course will help you draw attention to the difference between “knowing truth” and “living truth.” Print and fill-in your study guide as you go through the chapters. This will be graded at the end of the course.

Your first post will be up on the forum Monday, February 15th. You’ll make an initial post and respond to someone’s post.

The Value of Coaching – One ED’s Experience

As John Maxwell says “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” This truth can have significant  impact on a  person; empowering them as person and a leader, and at times overwhelming them. In my life and leadership I have found myself at both ends of that pendulum at one time or another, struggling to navigate my way through challenges associated with life’s success and the hard times that life provides. Recently I have been working with a friend who I not only respect but has been working in the field of consulting and coaching to professionals, leaders and pastors and in doing so discovered a key to success, I am not alone! The question is how do I take advantage of the resource of people God has given me? What does that look like?

For me this process is to summed up in this quote by Zuse and Skiffington:    

“Coaching is a conversation, a dialogue, whereby the coach and the individual interact in a dynamic exchange to achieve goals, enhance performance and move the individual forward to greater success.”

To do this Scott and I meet weekly at a consistent time and place a focused effort  addressing the issues that we are coming together to address. Whether the topics are business or personal this meeting is a safe place that I can be transparent and honest and expect honest feedback and guidance. We work on strategic planning, goal developing peoplesetting and organizational development. We cover staffing issues, budget concerns, upline struggles as well as failures and success. This is not a class or webinar this is another person helping me process through my real world circumstances. Not a boss or subordinate but a partner who is helping me find the best answer to the needs of my life and business realities. A coach to challenge and encourage me to be and do my absolute best in every situation. A coach is not a player on my team he is a person who is on my side and wants me to win because our lives and values are aligned through intentional choices and commitment to one another.

The writer of Proverbs tells us that “Where there is no guidance the people fall, But in abundance of counselors there is victory.”:… Together we win!

Article by: David Kincaid, Executive Director – Middle GA TC

October is Celebrate Rep’s Month!!

The ELP Rep is the key to the ELP on the local campus – they are a crucial element to the success and effectiveness of the program. This role is critical to raise up sons and daughters who are called long-term to Teen Challenge. Oftentimes it is overlooked so this month we want to take the time to celebrate the Rep’s on our campuses. Spend time to find out what fills their tank and make them feel appreciated. Here are a few ideas of how you can bless the Rep’s on your campus:

  • Celebrate their achievements –  talk about all the ways they have added value to the center both in front of them and when they are not around
  • Spend quality time – take them out to coffee or lunch and talk about them and what’s happening in their life
  • Give them a “just because” gift – gift cards are great but something handmade, personal and creative says more
  • Invest in their leadership – connect them with a mentor/coach or take them along with you to a meeting
  • Acts of Service – offer to conduct one of their weekly meetings
Business team celebrating over finalization of a contract

Take pics and post on the ELP Facebook page

Organizational Health is more felt than telt

Sometimes we get so caught up in the mundane activities we forget to step away from our desk and meet people where they are at. Recently I was at a conference where Simon Sinek talked about “eye ball” leadership – getting up from your desk and going where busy-office-workerspeople are at and look them in the eyes. Really what he was saying is – build relationship with your team. You can’t expect people to work hard for you if they don’t know you. Notice I said work hard – they’ll work for you but they won’t work “hard.” Years ago while working in the airline industry, we did a training on customer service. We only had about 30 seconds to a minute to check in a passenger but during that time we had to get to know them and make the process as personal as possible so they would fly with us again. If we go through such lengths to build relationship with the people who spend their monies with us, how much more we should put into knowing the people who are working with us for decades and some, a lifetime. People want to feel they are accepted, they are loved and they are making a difference. The single most important factor to the success of your team and the overall organization is having authentic relationship with the people you work with.

Simon says “If we set the environment right, trust and cooperation is an automatic response.” ” Leadership is a choice to be responsible for ourselves and the people around us; reinforce the relationship between you and your team members” (Sinek). Leadership requires our two greatest commodity – time and energy. It will take energy to get away from the task at hand to roam the halls to find out how people are doing and to bless them – to offer a word of encouragement or simply to say “thank you.” The best decision you can make every day as a leader is to add value to people. Let them know that you care, you believe in them and you believe they can succeed. Organizational health is more felt than telt.

Article submitted by: Andree Aiken (Training team)

Enrich Culture – Shifting the Values

I hope you took some time last month to reflect on “how things are going in your boat”… In that article we said that after prayer, the most important thing a leader can do is build a healthy culture for the teams they lead. Leaders must delegate a lot of things, but culture is not one of them. The leader is solely responsible for how healthy a team or ministry is. As a leader, being a “culture bearer” requires a shift in values, skills and allocation of time. For instance, as a staff member I should value being an effective contributor to the team and the mission. I do my part to enrich culture by embracing and embodying the Core Values and the TC DNA. I would be honing a particular skill such as teaching, counseling or computer skills. My time would be primarily allocated to working with students or in administration, completing my assigned tasks and responsibilities. As a leader, whether I’m leading a rally team, a work crew or a center, my values and skillset have to shift, as well as how I manage my time. It’s important what we value – we spend our time doing the things we value, and skills that are used without being instructed by values, aren’t done with much passion and creativity. So if I’m directing a center, and value making individual contributions such as counseling, I will probably pursue a degree in counseling and spend a lot of time counseling students. Instead, as a team leader, there has to be a shift – rather than valuing what I can contribute individually, I now value the success and contributions of others, I value the results of the whole team, I value the work and disciplines I need to do as a manager. This managerial skillset includes things like setting the culture, selecting the right people who are a fit for the culture, designing job descriptions, empowerment and delegation, performance evaluation and development, communication, building a cohesive team, and rewards and motivation. The book “The Leadership Pipeline” talks about this shift: “First-time managers need to learn how to reallocate their time so that they not only complete their assigned work but also help others perform effectively. They cannot allocate all of their time to putting out fires, seizing opportunities, and handling tasks themselves.” Putting out fires…yikes! Sounds like Teen Challenge! One of the challenges of leadership is slowing down the high speed train that we call Teen Challenge and valuing and spending time on the right things. Effective leaders and healthy organizations value an enriched culture and take the time to cultivate it. In the next 3 articles we’ll highlight 3 very practical areas in which a leader enriches culture: bringing the right people on the team, developing people, and building a cohesive team. In the meantime, assess how you allocate your time – how does it reflect what you value?

Article written by – Karissa Corpeny – Director of Corporate Training (TC Southeast)